CBCS BA Honours Syllabus In English 2018 Dibrugarh .

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CBCS BA Honours Syllabus in English 2018Dibrugarh UniversityAbstractCredit add-up Core: 70 credits (14x5) 14 (14x1Tutorial) 84 credits (14 courses)Discipline Specific Elective: 20(4x5) credits 4(4x1Tutorial) 24 credits (4 courses)Generic Elective: 20 (4x5) credits 4 (4x1Tutorial) 24 credits (4 courses)Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course: 08 credits (2 2 4) 8 credits (3 courses)Skill Enhancement Course: 08 credits (4 4) 8 credits (2 courses)Total: 148 credits (27 courses)Marks add-up Core courses: 1400 marks Discipline Specific Elective: 400 marks Generic Elective: 400 marks Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course: 200 (50 50 100) marks Skill Enhancement Course: 200 (100X2) marksTotal: 2600 marksCore courses (14 courses)Credits: 70 credits (05 credits per core X 14 core 70 credits) 14 credits (tutorial)Core courses offered: Core 1: Indian Classical Literature (Sem 1)Core 2: European Classical Literature (Sem 1)Core 3: Indian Writing in English (Sem 2)Core 4: British Poetry and Drama 14th to17th Century (Sem 2)Core 5: American Literature (Sem 3)Core 6: Popular Literature (Sem 3)Core 7: British Poetry and Drama 17th and18th Century (Sem 3)Core 8: British Literature: 18th Century (Sem 4)Core 9: British Romantic Literature (Sem 4)Core 10: British Literature: 19th Century (Sem 4)Core 11: Women‟s Writing (Sem 5)Core 12: British Literature: Early 20th Century (Sem 5)Core 13: Modern European Drama (Sem 6)Core 14: Postcolonial Literature (Sem 6)1

Discipline Specific Elective (DSE): (2 2 4 courses)Credits: 05 credits per elective 04 tutorial credits per elective 24 creditsDiscipline Specific Electives offered:Sem 5 (any two) DSE 1: Modern Indian Writing in English TranslationDSE 2: Literature of the Indian DiasporaDSE 3: Literary CriticismDSE 4: World LiteratureSem 6 (any two) DSE 5: Literary TheoryDSE 6: Literature and CinemaDSE 7: Partition LiteratureDSE 8: Travel WritingGeneric Elective (GE): (1 1 1 1 4 courses)Credits: 05 credits per elective 04 credits per tutorial 24 creditsGeneric Electives offered:GE 1: Academic Writing and Composition (Sem 1)GE 2: Media and Communication Skills (Sem 2)GE 3: Language and Linguistics (Sem 3)GE 4: Contemporary India: Women and Empowerment (Sem 4)Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course (AECC):Credits: 02 02 04 credits 08 creditsAbility Enhancement Compulsory Courses offered:AECC 1: English Communication (2 credits) (Sem 1)AECC 2: Alternative English (2 credits) (Sem 1)AECC 3: Environmental Study (4 credits) (Sem 2)Skill Enhancement Course (SEC):Credits: 04 credits per elective 08 creditsSkill Enhancement Courses offered:2

Sem 3 (Any one)SEC 1: English Language Teaching (ELT)SEC 2: Soft SkillsSem 4 (Any one)SEC 3: Creative WritingSEC 4: Business CommunicationDistribution of Courses:Sem I: 2 Core Courses (Core 1& 2), 2 AECC (AECC 1: English Communication, & AECC2: Alternative English), 1 GE (GE 1: Academic Writing & Composition)Sem II: 2 Core Courses (Core 3& 4), 1 AECC (AECC 3: Environmental Study), 1 GE (GE2: Media and Communication Skills)Sem III: 3 Core Courses (Core 5, 6, 7), 1 SEC (SEC 1: ELT or SEC 2: Soft Skills), 1 GE(GE 3: Language and Linguistics)Sem IV: 3 Core Courses (Core 8, 9, 10), 1 SEC (SEC 3: Creative Writing or SEC 4:Business Communication), 1 GE (GE 4: Contemporary India: Women and Empowerment)Sem V: 2 Core Courses (Core 11, 12), 2 DSE (out of 4 choices) (DSE 1: Modern IndianWriting in English Translation, DSE 2: Literature of the Indian Diaspora, DSE 3: LiteraryCriticism, DSE 4: World Literature)Sem VI: 2 Core Courses (Core 13, 14), 2 DSE (out of 4 choices) (DSE 5: Literary Theory,DSE 6: Literature and Cinema, DSE 7: Partition Literature, DSE 8: Travel Writing)Scheme of Evaluation:For Core English Honours Papers:Internal Assessment: 20 marks(Sessional test 1: 5marks, Sessional test 2: 5 marks, Presentation/viva voce/Group discussion:5 marks, Attendence: 5 marks)Total: 20 marksFinal Examination: 80 marksUnit 1: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 2: 1 long answer question 1 short note /analysis (15 05) 20 marks3

Unit 3: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 4: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksTotal: 80 marksFor Generic Elective Papers:Internal Assessment: 20 marks(Sessional test 1: 5marks, Sessional test 2: 5 marks, Presentation/viva voce/Group discussion:5 marks, Attendence: 5 marks)Total: 20 marksFinal Examination: 80 marksUnit 1: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 2: 1 long answer question 1 short note /analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 3: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 4: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksTotal: 80 marksFor Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course Paper (English Communication/Alternative English) of Two CreditsMidterm test [10 marks]Writing : 1 question 04 x 01qn 04 marksSpeaking: 2 questions 03x02 qns 06 marksTotal 10 marksFinal Semester ExaminationUnit 1: 02 questions 02x 05 qns 10 marks (2 prose and two poetry questions)Unit 2: 02 questions 02 x 05 qns 10 marksUnit 3: 02 questions 02 x 5 qns 10 marksUnit 4: 02 questions 02 x 5 qns 10 marksTotal 40 marks4

DETAILED SYLLABIB. A. HONOURS ENGLISH UNDER CBCSDIBRUGARH UNIVERSITY - 2018FIRST SEMESTERCOURSE CODE: 10100COURSE 1: INDIAN CLASSICAL LITERATURE(CORE)CREDITS ASSIGNED: 6 CREDITSCOURSE OBJECTIVES: The objective of this course is to acquaint the students with the richcultural heritage of ancient Indian literature, especially Sanskrit Literature. Indian classical literaturecan truly claim the distinction of achieving the highest peak of art form in Sanskrit in the immortalplays of Kalidasa, the epics The Ramayana and The Mahabharata, Shudraka‟s Mrcchakatika,among others. Although Srimanta Sankaradeva of Assam cannot be regarded as „classical‟ from thepurview of temporality, his works are characterised by classical sensibilities and in the context ofAssamese literature and culture, his works are held as immortal classics. Therefore, one of his famousplays Parijata Harana has been prescribed.UNIT 1: CLASSICAL SANSKRIT DRAMAKalidasa, Abhijnana Shakuntalam, tr. Chandra Rajan, in Kalidasa: The Loom of Time (NewDelhi: Penguin, 1989).UNIT II: SELECTIONS FROM EPIC SANSKRIT LITERATUREVyasa, „The Dicing‟ and „The Sequel to Dicing, „The Book of the Assembly Hall‟, „TheTemptation of Karna‟, Book V „The Book of Effort‟, in The Mahabharata: tr. and ed.J.A.B. van Buitenen (Chicago: Brill, 1975) pp. 106–69.UNIT III: SANSKRIT DRAMASudraka, Mrcchakatika, tr. M.M. Ramachandra Kale (New Delhi: Motilal Banarasidass,1962).UNIT IV: CLASSICAL ASSAMESE DRAMAShankaradeva, Parijata Harana [trans. William L. Smith] from Krishna. A Source Book, ed.Edwin Francis Bryant (London: OUP, 2007). [www.atributetosankaradeva.org/parijata.pdf]5

SUGGESTED TOPICS AND BACKGROUND PROSE READINGS FOR CLASSPRESENTATIONSTOPICSThe Indian Epic Tradition: Themes and RecensionsClassical Indian Drama: Theory and PracticeAlankara and RasaDharma and the HeroicNeo-vaishnavaite Movement in AssamAnkiya NatMODE OF ASSESSMENT:Internal Assessment: 20 marks(Sessional test 1: 5marks, Sessional test 2: 5 marks, Presentation/viva voce/Group discussion:5 marks, Attendance: 5 marks)Total: 20 marksFinal Examination: 80 marksUnit 1: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 2: 1 long answer question 1 short note /analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 3: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 4: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksTotal: 80 marksEXPECTED LEARNER OUTCOMEAfter completing this course, the learners shall be in a position to understand and appreciate the richIndian classical literary tradition, including its distinctive aesthetic philosophies. It would providethem with the conceptual resources to make a comparative assessment between the Indian and theWestern classical tradition, thereby enabling their knowledge and understanding of the two greatancient literary traditions.RECOMMENDED READINGS1. Bharata, Natyashastra, tr. Manomohan Ghosh, vol. I, 2nd edn (Calcutta: Granthalaya, 1967) chap.6: „Sentiments‟, pp. 100–18.2. Iravati Karve, „Draupadi‟, in Yuganta: The End of an Epoch (Hyderabad: Disha, 1991) pp. 79–105.3. J.A.B. Van Buitenen, „Dharma and Moksa‟, in Roy W. Perrett, ed., Indian Philosophy, vol. V,Theory of Value: A Collection of Readings (New York: Garland, 2000) pp. 33–40.4. Vinay Dharwadkar, „Orientalism and the Study of Indian Literature‟, in Orientalism and thePostcolonial Predicament: Perspectives on South Asia, ed. Carol A. Breckenridge and Peter van derVeer (New Delhi: OUP, 1994) pp. 158–95.5. Maheswar Neog, Sankaradeva. (New Delhi: NBT, 2005).6

6. Maheswar Neog, Early History of the Vaisnava Faith and Movement in Assam: Sankaradeva andHis Times (1965; reprint, Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, 1983).7, Birinchi Kumar Barua, ed, Ankiya Nat (1940), 3rd ed. (Guwahati: Department of Historical andAntiquarian Studies in Assam, 1983).COURSE CODE: 10200COURSE 2: EUROPEAN CLASSICAL LITERATURE(CORE)CREDITS ASSIGNED: 6 CREDITSCOURSE OBJECTIVES: European Classical literature implies the literature of ancientGreece and Rome. The study of „ancient Greek literature‟ implies a study of literature writtenin Greek in the pre Christian period, by non-Christians in the first six centuries of theChristian era. Roman literature, written in the Latin language, remains an enduring legacy ofthe culture of ancient Rome. Latin literature drew heavily on the traditions of other cultures,particularly the more matured literary tradition of Greece, and the strong influence of earlierGreek authors are readily apparent. The purpose of this course is to acquaint learners with thegreat heritage of European classical literature, starting from Homer‟s epic The Iliad to thesatires of Horace. The importance of this course rests on the fact that English literature isheavily indebted to the classical works of Greece and Rome. Whether it is tragedy orcomedy, satire or criticism, epic or lyric, the influence of classical literature in the works ofthe English authors is clearly in evidence. Therefore, learners will be acquainted withimmortal classics like The Iliad and Metamorphosis, get to know of the difference betweenthe Greek classics and the Latin classics, the different genres dabbled in by the classicalwriters, such as, tragedy, comedy, epic, satire, criticism and so forth.UNIT I: CLASSICAL GREEK EPIC1. Homer, The Iliad, tr. E.V. Rieu (Harmondsworth: Penguin,1985).UNIT II: CLASSICAL GREEK TRAGEDY2. Sophocles , Antigone, tr. Robert Fagles in Sophocles: The Three Theban Plays(Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1984).UNIT III: CLASSICAL ROMAN COMEDY3. Plautus, Pot of Gold, tr. E.F. Watling (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1965).UNIT IV: CLASSICAL ROMAN EPIC/NARRATIVE POEM4. Ovid, Selections from Metamorphoses „Bacchus‟, (Book III), „Pyramus and Thisbe‟(BookIV), „Philomela‟ (Book VI), tr. Mary M. Innes (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1975).5. Horace „Satires I: 4, in Horace: Satires and Epistles and Persius: Satires, tr. NiallRudd (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 2005).7

SUGGESTED TOPICS AND BACKGROUND PROSE READINGS FOR CLASSPRESENTATIONSTOPICSThe EpicComedy and Tragedy in Classical DramaThe Athenian City StateCatharsis and MimesisSatireLiterary Cultures in Augustan RomeMODE OF ASSESSMENT:Internal Assessment: 20 marks(Sessional test 1: 5marks, Sessional test 2: 5 marks, Presentation/viva voce/Group discussion:5 marks, Attendance: 5 marks)Total: 20 marksFinal Examination: 80 marksUnit 1: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 2: 1 long answer question 1 short note /analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 3: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 4: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksTotal: 80 marksEXPECTED LEARNER OUTCOMEAfter the completion of the course, the learners shall be in a position to understand the source ofWestern literary paradigm – a formation that was responsible for constituting the great tradition of thewestern canon, and one which govern our critical or comparative touchstone on „what good literatureought to be.‟RECOMMENDED READINGS1. Aristotle, Poetics, translated with an introduction and notes by Malcolm Heath, (London:Penguin, 1996) chaps. 6–17, 23, 24, and 26.2. Plato, The Republic, Book X, tr. Desmond Lee (London: Penguin, 2007).3. Horace, Ars Poetica, tr. H. Rushton Fairclough, Horace: Satires, Epistles and Ars Poetica(Cambridge Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2005) pp. 451–73.8

SECOND SEMESTERCOURSE CODE: 20100COURSE 3: INDIAN WRITING IN ENGLISH(CORE)CREDITS ASSIGNED: 6 CREDITSCOURSE OBJECTIVES: Indian Writing in English refers to the body of work by writers inIndia who write English and whose native language could be one of the numerous languagesof India. It is also associated with the works of members of the Indian Diaspora. As acategory, this production comes under the broader realm of postcolonial literature- theproduction from previously colonized countries such as India. Indian English Literature is anhonest enterprise to demonstrate the ever rare gems of Indian Writing in English. From beingsingular and exceptional, rather gradual native flare - up of geniuses, Indian Writing inEnglish has turned out to be a new form of Indian culture and voice in which India conversesregularly. Indian Writers - poets, novelists, essayists, and dramatists have been makingmomentous and considerable contributions to world literature since pre - Independence era,the past few years have witnessed a gigantic prospering and thriving of Indian EnglishWriting in the global market. Indian English Literature has attained an independent status inthe realm of world Literature. Wide ranges of themes are dealt within Indian Writing inEnglish. While this literature continues to reflect Indian culture, tradition, social values andeven Indian history through the depiction of life in India and Indians living elsewhere, recentIndian English fiction has been trying to give expression to the Indian experience of themodern predicaments. The aim of this course is to introduce learners to Indian Writing inEnglish from the colonial to the postcolonial period. Issues such as identity politics, gendereddifferences, home, dislocation, language among others shall be underscored with the intentionto understand the diversity of Indian culture and tradition across spatiality.UNIT I: PRE-INDEPENDENCE INDIAN ENGLISH NOVELR.K. Narayan The English TeacherUNIT II: POST-INDEPENDENCE INDIAN ENGLISH NOVELAnita Desai In Custody OR, Mitra Phukan The Collector’s WifeUNIT III: INDIAN ENGLISH POETRYH.L.V. Derozio „Freedom to the Slave‟, „The Orphan Girl‟Kamala Das „Introduction‟, „My Grandmother‟s House‟Nissim Ezekiel „Enterprise‟, „The Night of the Scorpion‟Robin S. Ngangom „The Strange Affair of Robin S. Ngangom‟, „A Poem for Mother‟UNIT IV: INDIAN ENGLISH SHORT STORIESMulk Raj Anand „Two Lady Rams‟Salman Rushdie „The Free Radio‟Shashi Deshpande „The Intrusion‟Arup Kumar Dutta „The Wilted Flower‟9

SUGGESTED TOPICS AND BACKGROUND PROSE READINGS FOR CLASSPRESENTATIONSTOPICSIndian EnglishIndian English Literature and its ReadershipThemes and Contexts of the Indian English NovelThe Aesthetics of Indian English PoetryModernism in Indian English LiteratureMODE OF ASSESSMENT:Internal Assessment: 20 marks(Sessional test 1: 5marks, Sessional test 2: 5 marks, Presentation/viva voce/Group discussion:5 marks, Attendance: 5 marks)Total: 20 marksFinal Examination: 80 marksUnit 1: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 2: 1 long answer question 1 short note /analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 3: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 4: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksTotal: 80 marksEXPECTED LEARNER OUTCOMEIt is believed that learners, after the culmination of this course, shall be in a better position toappreciate the diversity of customs and traditions in India, would be able to map theintellectual trajectory from the pre- to post -independence period, and get the feel of theadvancement that Indian writers in English are making, for which they are receiving plaudits,both at home as well as abroad.RECOMMENDED READINGS1. Raja Rao, Foreword to Kanthapura (New Delhi: OUP, 1989) pp. v–vi.2. Salman Rushdie, „Commonwealth Literature does not exist‟, in Imaginary Homelands(London: Granta Books, 1991) pp. 61–70.10

3. Meenakshi Mukherjee, „Divided by a Common Language‟, in The Perishable Empire(New Delhi: OUP, 2000) pp.187–203.4. Bruce King, „Introduction‟, in Modern Indian Poetry in English (New Delhi: OUP, 2ndedn, 2005) pp. 1–10.COURSE CODE: 20200COURSE 4: BRITISH POETRY AND DRAMA: 14TH TO 17TH CENTURIES(CORE)CREDITS ASSIGNED: 6 CREDITSCOURSE OBJECTIVES: The objective of this course is to acquaint the learners withBritish poetry and drama from Chaucer to Shakespeare. The texts prescribed relate to the Ageof Chaucer, Pre-Elizabethan and Elizabethan periods. Shakespeare figures predominantly inthis course, with a tragedy, comedy and two sonnets prescribed. Marlowe‟s play encapsulatesthe spirit of the Renaissance, thereby placing the Elizabethan period in a proper perspective.UNIT I: POETRYGeoffrey Chaucer, The Wife of Bath’s PrologueEdmund Spenser, Selections from Amoretti:Sonnet LVII: „Sweet warrior.‟Sonnet LXXV : „One day I wrote her name.‟William Shakepeare, Sonnet 30, 116John Donne, „The Sunne Rising‟, „Death be Not Proud‟UNIT II: ELIZABETHAN/RENAISSANCE DRAMAChristopher Marlowe, Doctor FaustusUNIT III: SHAKESPEARE’S TRAGEDYWilliam Shakespeare, MacbethUNIT IV: SHAKESPEARE’S COMEDYWilliam Shakespeare, Twelfth NightSUGGESTED TOPICS AND BACKGROUND PROSE READINGS FOR CLASSPRESENTATIONSTOPICSRenaissance HumanismThe Stage, Court and CityReligious and Political Thought11

Ideas of Love and MarriageThe Writer in SocietyMODE OF ASSESSMENT:Internal Assessment: 20 marks(Sessional test 1: 5marks, Sessional test 2: 5 marks, Presentation/viva voce/Group discussion:5 marks, Attendance: 5 marks)Total: 20 marksFinal Examination: 80 marksUnit 1: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 2: 1 long answer question 1 short note /analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 3: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksUnit 4: 1 long answer question 1 short note/analysis (15 05) 20 marksTotal: 80 marksEXPECTED LEARNER OUTCOMEAfter completing this course, the learners would be in a position to determine the influence ofthe European Renaissance on the works of the Elizabethan authors, including Shakespeare.RECOMMENDED READINGS1. Pico Della Mirandola, excerpts from the Oration on the Dignity of Man, in The PortableRenaissance Reader, ed. James Bruce Ross and Mary Martin McLaughlin (New York:Penguin Books, 1953) pp. 476–9.2. John Calvin, „Predestination and Free Will‟, in The Portable Renaissance Reader, ed.James Bruce Ross and Mary Martin McLaughlin (New York: Penguin Books, 1953) pp. 704–11.3. Baldassare Castiglione, „Longing for Beauty‟ and „Invocation of Love‟, in Book 4 of TheCourtier, „Love and Beauty‟, tr. George Bull (Harmondsworth: Penguin, rpt. 1983) pp. 324–8, 330–5.4. Philip Sidney, An Apology for Poetry, ed. Forrest G. Robinson (Indianapolis: BobbsMerrill, 1970) pp. 13–18.12

THIRD SEMESTERCOURSE CODE: 30100COURSE 5: AMERICAN LITERATURE(CORE)CREDITS ASSIGNED: 6 CREDITSCOURSE OBJECTIVES: The objective of this course is to introduce the learners toAmerican literature, a field that could be considered as comparatively recent in formulation,when compared to the literature of Britain and Continental Europe. It is a literature steeped inthe reactionary philosophy of its Puritan forbears, and has a strong individualistic spiritrunning through it. The reality or illusion of the Great American Dream, the tra

For Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course Paper (English Communication/ Alternative English) of Two Credits Midterm test [10 marks] Writing : 1 question 04 x 01qn 04 marks Speaking: 2 questions 03x02 qns 06 marks Total 10 marks Final Semester Examination Unit 1: 02 question