DINOSAUR BOY - Sourcebooks

9m ago
26 Views
1 Downloads
1.34 MB
20 Pages
Last View : 4d ago
Last Download : 2m ago
Upload by : Aarya Seiber
Transcription

A Common Core StateStandards Aligned Discussion &Activity Guide forDINOSAURBOYGrades: 3-6ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9Written by Cory Putman OakesPublished by Sourcebooks JabberwockyEveryone knows the dinosaur gene skips a generation.So it isn’t a complete surprise when Sawyer sprouts spikes and a tail before the start of fifthgrade. After all, his grandfather was part stegosaurus.Despite the Principal’s Zero Tolerance Policy, Sawyer becomes a bully magnet, befriended onlyby Elliot aka “Gigantor” and the weird new girl. When the bullies start disappearing, Sawyer isrelieved—until he discovers a secret about the principal that’s more shocking than Dino DNA.The bullies are in for a galactically horrible fate and it’s up to Sawyer and his friends to rescuethem.Guide Created by Debbie Gonzales

2Table of ContentsDiscussion Questions . 3Perspective Pinwheels . 7Perspective Pinwheel Worksheet #1 . 8Perspective Pinwheel Worksheet #2 . 9Author’s Notes Word Scramble Puzzle . 10Word Scramble Puzzle . 11Word Scramble Puzzle Answers . 12Dinosaur Boy Research – KWL .13Dinosaur Boy Research Topics . 14KWL Graphic Organizer .15Common Core State Standards Alignment:English Language Arts Standards » Reading: Literature. 16English Language Arts Standards » Reading: Foundational Skills . 17English Language Arts Standards » Writing .18English Language Arts Standards » Speaking & Listening . 19Acknowledgments. 20Oakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com

3Discussion QuestionsMy mom didn’t understand why I would be nervous on my first morning back to schoolas a part dinosaur (pg. 5). During the summer, Sawyer stated, “All things considered, I was adjusting pretty well to my newcircumstances. (pg. 4)” Tell why things seemed to be going well for Sawyer during the summer.Explain why Sawyer felt nervous about going back to school. List the elements of the schoolsetting that might cause Sawyer to feel uncomfortable.Evaluate Sawyer’s anxious feelings regarding returning to school. Are his feelings justifiable?How so?WryIj“I guess you’re right,” I said, feeling a little bit less hurt than I had a moment ago. “But most peoplecan hide their weirdness a little bit better than I can. (pg. 54)” Consider the characters in the story and their relationship with Sawyer.o Describe Elliot’s connection with Sawyer. Explain the foundation for their friendship. Identify his desires. What does Elliot want? Discuss Elliot’s ‘weirdness.’o Explore Sylvie’s relationship with Sawyer. Analyze Sylvie. List distinctive aspects of her character. Give reasons why Sylvie desires to be Sawyer’s friend. What does Sylvie want?o Consider Allan’s relationship with Sawyer. Identify reasons why Allan bullies Sawyer. In your opinion, would Allan bully Sawyer if he weren’t part dinosaur? Explainyour answer. Discuss the motives behind Allan’s actions. Identify what Allan wants.Elliot’s father believes that “ no one is normal. Not once you get to know them. (pg. 54)” Doyou agree with his statement? Give reasons for your answer.Oakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com

4“Sawyer knows what I’m talking about. He’s a monster. He doesn’t belong in a school. I’m goingto prove it and when I do, they’ll put him somewhere safe. Like a zoo. Or some lab. Just as soonas they recognize him for the freak he is. (pg. 96)” Define the word ‘monster.’Identify monster-like characteristics.Consider Allan and Sawyer’s characters. Of the two, which demonstrates the most monster-likebehaviors? Explain your answer.Define the word ‘freak.’Identify freak-like characteristics.Is there some truth to Allan’s accusations? Is Sawyer dangerous? Justify your answer.In response to Allan’s statement, Sawyer surprises himself and others releasing a cafeteriashaking roar. Identify the origin of Sawyer’s outburst. Explain your answer.s19u6“Of course they’re safe,” Principal Mathis looked aghast. “What do you thinkhas happened to them, Sawyer? (pg. 103)” Sawyer is concerned for the safety of kids who have bullied him. What does this behavior revealabout Sawyer’s nature?Explain why Sawyer is hesitant to tell Principal Mathis that Allan has been bullying him.Predict why Principal Mathis seemed persistent about Sawyer reporting Allan’s cruelty towardhim.Explain why Principal Mathis excused Sawyer for his unsettling roar, even though two fifthgraders experienced nervous breakdowns because of it.Define the term ‘rehabilitation.’Consider the quote Victor Hugo quote Principal Mathis had framed on her office wall – He whoopens a school door, closes a prison.o Summarize the message behind the quote.o Predict why the framed quote was the only piece of art work on her office wall.o Tell how the framed quote serves as a foreshadowing of the events that follow in thestory.Oakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com

5“Because we’re friends,” she spat at him. “Friends tell each other secrets.Friends also keep each other’s secrets. (pg. 152)” Identify the risk Sylvie has created by revealing her secret to Elliot and Sawyer.Sylvie identified herself as being an “illegal alien. (pg. 151)” Explain what she meant by this.Contrast Elliot, Sawyer, and Sylvie. Tell of ways that they differ from one another.Compare the three. Describe ways that they are the same.Define friendship.Do you agree with Sylvie’s statement regarding secrecy and friendship? Explain your answer.Psnqh“Why?” Elliot jumped off of his desk, suddenly quite intent. “Why is it more important? Why do youcare so much about saving those those bullies? (170)” Examine Elliot’s reaction regarding saving the kids Principal Mathis plans to sell. Is his refusal toparticipate in saving them justified? How so?Elliot asks, “If it were you, me, and Sawyer, do you think Allan would lift a finger to help us? (pg.171)” Examine the evidence supporting this claim. If places were switched, would Allan risk hissafety to help Elliot, Sylvie, and Sawyer? Explain your answer.Elliot states that Sylvie’s judgment of humans is skewed because she is “half-human (pg. 171).”Sawyer reminds Elliot that he, too, is half-human. Discuss why Elliot discounts Sawyer’s halfhuman-ness.Analyze what this action reveals about Elliot’s character.In contrast, examine what Sawyer’s willingness to rescue the others reveals about Sawyer’scharacter. Explain why Sawyer is willing to risk everything to save those who have treated himso cruelly.GIw;aOakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com

6“You can’t take him!” I yelled. “Elliot is one of the good ones! The best ones! You said it yourself,you never take the good ones! (183)” Explain the consequences of this plot twist. Discuss the high stakes involved now that Elliot hasbeen captured.Evaluate Sawyer’s claim that Elliot is one of ‘the best ones.’ On what grounds does Sawyermake this claim? Explain your answer.Examine the significance of Elliot being the thirteenth kid to be captured. Explain the symbolismof the number thirteen as a literary tool.Identify a change in Sawyer’s character. Examine what his willingness to confront PrincipalMathis reveals about his growing confidence.94ms;I had come so far. The skin on the underside of my tail had toughed up, so it no longer hurt to dragmy tail around. I hardly ever lost tennis balls off the ends of my spikes on accident anymore.And my mom had finished altering all of my clothes to fit over my dinosaur parts. I didn’t quite havethe roaring thing under control, but I was sure that I’d figure that out, too. Eventually (pg. 213). Explain what Sawyer meant by stating “ he had come so far.”Explore how his developing tough skin on the underside of his tail serves as a metaphor for hisgrowth as a character.Discuss why not losing the tennis ball protectors is important to Sawyer. Tell what this actionsays about his growth as a character.Decide whether Sawyer should be concerned about keeping his roar under control. Identifyreasons why having a good, strong roar might be beneficial.Discuss why Sawyer chose not to not to drink the blue liquid in the vial his grandfather gave him.What would be lost, if he did? What would be gained, if he didn’t? Explain your answer.Describe why Sawyer’s grandfather asked Sawyer if he had stood in the wind (pg. 214). Examinethe significance of that statement.ZxvbnOakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com

7Perspective PinwheelsObjective: To analyze and describe characters’ varied points of view in the story and explain how theiractions contributed to their change in perspective.Materials: Perspective Pinwheel Worksheets #1 and #2 (Guide, pgs. 8-9)Dinosaur BoyPencilProcedure: Explain the term ‘perspective’ as being as one’s outlook, attitude, or way of looking atsomething. The intention of this activity is to analyze various characters’ change in theirperspective regarding Sawyer’s hybrid plates and tails.Print the Perspective Pinwheel Worksheets #1 and #2.Discuss Sawyer, Elliot, Sylvia, and Allan’s perspectives in the first section of the book, inparticular Chapters 7 and 8 (pgs. 45-67). Using the Perspective Pinwheel Worksheet #1, statehow each character felt about Sawyer’s hybrid plates at this point of the story and why. Tellwhat their point of view reveals about their character. Analyze the various reasons for eachcharacter’s perspective. Record impressions in the spaces provided on the graphic organizer.Discuss Sawyer, Elliot, Sylvia, and Allan’s perspectives in the final section of the book, inparticular Chapters 22 and 23 (pgs.185-204). Using the Perspective Pinwheel Worksheet #2,state how each character felt about Sawyer’s hybrid plates at this point of the story and why.Explain their change in perspective, if at all. Describe the experiences that created their points ofview. Record impressions in the spaces provided on the graphic organizer.Explore the effects of their conflicts. Describe the lessons learned by each character. Tell howtheir relationships brought about changes in perspective.Io6gOakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com2

8Perspective Pinwheel Worksheet #1“Don’t let the other kids give you a hard time,” he told me. “Hold your head up high; make every kidin your class with that they had plates and a tail. (pg. 4)”Oakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com

9Perspective Pinwheel Worksheet #2All of a sudden, I realized something. Totally by accident, I had finally achieved what my fatheradvised me to do on the first day of school (pg. 196).Oakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com

10Author’s Notes Word Scramble PuzzleObjective: To practice the application of grade-level word analysis skills in decoding words.Materials: Dinosaur BoyWord Scramble Puzzle (Guide, pg. 11)PencilWord Scramble Puzzle Answers (Guide, pg. 12)Procedure: Instruct students to turn to the Author’s Notes (pgs. 215-217) section in Dinosaur Boy.Tell them to read this sections closely as the clues for the Word Scramble are listed there.Print out the Word Scramble Puzzle.Instruct students to solve the scrambled word puzzles, referencing the Author’s Notes section asneeded.When completed, check answers using the Word Scramble Puzzle Answers provided.Oakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com

11Word Scramble PuzzleOakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com

12Word Scramble Puzzle AnswersOakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com

13Dinosaur Boy Research – KWLObjective: To understand topics through the analysis of known facts, information interested inresearching, and by listing and citing facts learned as a result of the research process.Materials: Dinosaur Boy – Author’s Notes (pgs. 215-217)Dinosaur Boy Research Topics List (Guide, pg. 14)KWL Graphic Organizer (Guide, pg. 15)PencilAge-appropriate research materials – primary and secondary sourcesProcedure: In the Author’s Note section of the book, author Cory Putman Oakes states, “ if you read veryclosely you’ll find dinosaurs (and the people who study them) all over this book. (pg. 215)” Thesubjects printed on Dinosaur Boy Research Topics List have been generated by the inspirationspresented by Ms. Oakes in her Author’s Notes.Instruct the students to choose a subject presented on the Dinosaur Boy Research Topics List.Once the student has decided upon a topic, give them a copy of the KWL Graphic Organizer.In the first column, under the word “Know,” instruct the student to list everything that theyalready know about that topic.In the second column, under the words “Want to Know,” instruct students to list things thatthey would want to know about the topic, things that interest them.In the third column, under the words “Learned,” instruct the students to write things that theylearned about their topic while researching it. Quite often, these facts can be quite surprising!Tell students to cite the references they used in the “References” box at the bottom of the KWLGraphic Organizer.Instruct the student to use this information to write and illustrate a short, annotatedinformative essay on their chosen topic.Reference: Allen, Camille Ann. The Multigenre Research Paper: Voice, Passion, and Discovery in Grades 4-6. Portsmouth, NH:Heinemann, 2001. (pg. 31-2).Oakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com

14Dinosaur Boy Research TopicsOakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com

15KWL Graphic OrganizerKnowAwWant to KnowpReferences:Oakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.comLearned;

16Common Core State Standards AlignmentDescribe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain howtheir actions contribute to the sequence of eventsCCSS.ELALiteracy.RL.3.6Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.CCSS.ELALiteracy.RL.3.10By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, andpoetry, at the high end of the grades 2-3 text complexity band independently andproficiently.CCSS.ELALiteracy.RL.4.1Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly andwhen drawing inferences from the text.CCSS.ELALiteracy.RL.4.3Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specificdetails in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions).CCSS.ELALiteracy.RL.4.6Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated,including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.CCSS.ELALiteracy.RL.4.10By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, andpoetry, in the grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed atthe high end of the range.CCSS.ELALiteracy.RL.5.3Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama,drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).CCSS.ELALiteracy.RL.5.10By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, andpoetry, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently andproficiently.CCSS.ELALiteracy.RL.6.1Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well asinferences drawn from the text.Oakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com .ELALiteracy.RL.3.3%Word ScrambleAsk and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly tothe text as the basis for the answers.Perspective PinwheelsCCSS.ELALiteracy.RL.3.1Discussion QuestionsEnglish Language Arts Standards » Reading: Literature%%%%%%

17Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.CCSS.ELALiteracy.RF.3.4.aRead grade-level text with purpose and understanding.CCSS.ELALiteracy.RF.4.3Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.CCSS.ELALiteracy.RF.4.3.aUse combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns,and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabicwords in context and out of context.CCSS.ELALiteracy.RF.4.4Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.CCSS.ELALiteracy.RF.4.4.aRead grade-level text with purpose and understanding.CCSS.ELALiteracy.RF.5.3Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.CCSS.ELALiteracy.RF.5.3.aUse combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns,and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabicwords in context and out of context.CCSS.ELALiteracy.RF.5.4Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.CCSS.ELALiteracy.RF.5.4.aRead grade-level text with purpose and understanding.ttttttttttOakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com ord ScrambleKnow and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.Perspective PinwheelsCCSS.ELALiteracy.RF.3.3Discussion QuestionsEnglish Language Arts Standards » Reading: FoundationalSkills

18KWLWord ScramblePerspective PinwheelsDiscussion QuestionsEnglish Language Arts Standards » WritingCCSS.ELALiteracy.W.3.2Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas andinformation clearly.CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.3.2.aIntroduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations whenuseful to aiding comprehension.CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.3.2.bDevelop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.3.7Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.4.2Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas andinformation clearly.CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.4.2.bDevelop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or otherinformation and examples related to the topic.CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.4.4Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization areappropriate to task, purpose, and audience.CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.4.7Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of differentaspects of a topic.CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.4.9Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, andresearch.CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.5.2Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas andinformation clearly.CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.5.2.bDevelop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or otherinformation and examples related to the topic.CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.5.4Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization areappropriate to task, purpose, and audience.CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.5.7Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge throughinvestigation of different aspects of a topic.CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.6.2Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, andinformation through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.6.2.bDevelop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or otherinformation and examples.CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.6.4Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and styleare appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.Oakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com.

199Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented indiverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and .4.2Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led)with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing theirown clearly.99Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats,including visually, quantitatively, and .5.2Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led)with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing theirown clearly.99Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats,including visually, quantitatively, and orally.9CCSS.ELALiteracy.SL.6.1Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led)with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressingtheir own clearly.Oakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com99KWL9Word ScrambleCCSS.ELALiteracy.SL.3.2Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led)with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing theirown clearly.Perspective PinwheelsCCSS.ELALiteracy.SL.3.1Discussion QuestionsEnglish Language Arts Standards » Speaking & Listening

20AcknowledgmentsWritten by Cory Putman Oakeswww.corypoakes.comPublished by Sourcebooks Jabberwockywww.sourcebooks.comGuide Created by Debbie Gonzaleswww.debbiegonzales.comOakes, Cory Putman. Dinosaur Boy. Naperville: Sourcebooks, 2015. Print.ISBN: 978-1-492-60537-9 www.corypoakes.com www.debbiegonzales.com

Perspective Pinwheel Worksheets #1 and #2 (Guide, pgs. 8-9) Dinosaur Boy Pencil Procedure: Explain the term perspective as being as ones outlook, attitude, or way of looking at something. The intention of this activity is to analyze various characters change in