Burner Fire - Thunderhead Eng

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Burner Fire2017

Burner FireBurner FireIn this tutorial you will create a 500 kW burner fire and measure the temperature in the center of theplume at a height of 1.5 m. This example defines a fire by specifying a Heat Release Rate (HRR). This isboth the simplest and most commonly used approach for fire safety engineers to represent fire.For this example, it is sufficient to understand that modeling a fire using the heat release rate requiresthe user to specify two pieces of input data: A reaction that defines the products and energy release during combustion and,A heat release rate that defines size of the fire. When this is specified, FDS actually releases fuelat a mass flow rate based on the reaction energy for complete combustion. This is usuallyspecified as heat release rate per unit area and is assigned to a surface.Once the reaction and heat release rate are defined, fuel is released from the surface, mixes with air,and reacts to form combustion products (including heat). A longer (but still brief) introduction to firemodeling is given in the Room Fire example.Figure 1. Burner fire in this example1

Burner FireThis tutorial demonstrates how to: Create a burner fire.Add a thermocouple.Add a slice plane for temperature visualization.View 3D results using Smokeview.View 2D results using PyroSim.The FDS input file listing is provided at the end of this document. You can import this directly intoPyroSim.Select SI UnitsTo select SI units:1. On the View menu, click Units and select SI to display values using the metric system.Create the MeshIn this example we will use mesh cells that are 0.1 m across. This value is somewhat smaller than 1/5 ofthe characteristic diameter (D*) for a 500 kW fire. As a rule of thumb, recommended cell sizes rangefrom 1/5 to 1/20 of D* to ensure at least a moderate level of accuracy in modeling the plume(McGrattan, Kevin, et al. 2014). Using mesh cells that are smaller by a factor of 2 should decrease errorby a factor of 4, but will increase the simulation run time by a factor of 16.1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.11.On the Model menu, click Edit Meshes.Click New.Click OK to create the mesh.In the Min X box, type –1 and in the Max X box, type 1.In the Min Y box, type –1 and in the Max Y box, type 1.In the Min Z box, type 0 and in the Max Z box, type 3.In the X Cells box, type 20.In the Y Cells box, type 20.In the Z Cells box, type 30.Click OK to save changes and close the Edit Meshes dialog.On the View menu, click Fill View to resize the image.2

Burner FireFigure 2. Creating the meshDefine the ReactionFor simulations that include combustion, the user must define a reaction.1.2.3.4.5.On the Model menu, click Edit Reactions.Click Add From Library.Select the POLYURETHANE GM27 reaction and add it to the current model.Click Close.Click OK to close the Edit Reactions dialog.Create the Fire SurfaceSurfaces are used to define the properties of objects in your FDS model. In this example, we define aburner (fire) surface that releases heat at a rate of 1000 kW/m2.1. On the Model menu, click Edit Surfaces.3

Burner Fire2.3.4.5.6.Click New.In the Surface Name box, type Fire, Figure 3.In the Surface Type list, select Burner.Click OK to create the new burner surface.Click OK to save changes and close the Edit Surfaces dialog.Figure 3. Inserting a new burner surfaceFigure 4. Default parameters for the burner surface4

Burner FireCreate the FireNow that we define the fire location in our model. In this example, we will first create an obstructionand then place the fire (defined by a vent) on the obstruction. If the fire covered an entire side of theobstruction, we could just assign the fire surface to the obstruction and not use a vent. If the fire was ona model boundary, we could just use a vent and not include an obstruction.First we create the obstruction:1.2.3.4.5.6.7.On the Model menu, click New Obstruction.In the ID box, type Fire Obstruction.Click on the

Burner Fire 1 Burner Fire In this tutorial you will create a 500 kW burner fire and measure the temperature in the center of the plume at a height of 1.5 m. This example defines a fire by specifying a Heat Release Rate (HRR). This is both the simplest and most commonly used approach for fire