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GET INTOFIGHTINGWEIGHT:A TOTAL FORCEFITNESS GUIDE

CON T E N TS4INTRODUCTION5CHALLENGE 1: ASSESS YOUR HABITSCREATE NEW HABITS TO HELP YOU LOSE WEIGHT7HABITS TRACKER 9GET SMART ABOUT SETTING GOALS 10SMART GOALS PLANNER 12SMART GOALS PLANNER 133 STRATEGIES TO BUILD MOTIVATION FOR LOSING WEIGHT14ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: CHALLENGE 1 1718CHALLENGE 2: CREATE A ONE-WEEK MEAL PLANWHAT IS A “HEALTHY” WEIGHT-LOSS EATING PLAN, ANYWAY?20PROS AND CONS OF POPULAR EATING STYLES23HOW TO USE A HUNGER SCALE FOR HEALTHIER HABITS26POWER PLATE: EAT TO FUEL YOUR PERFORMANCE28FAD DIET RED FLAGS 29SAMPLE GROCERY LIST AND WORKSHEET31MY GROCERY LIST 33SMART GROCERY SHOPPING ON A BUDGET34SAMPLE 7-DAY MEAL PLAN AND WORKSHEET357-DAY MEAL PLAN WORKSHEET 36MAKE HEALTHY CHOICES, EVEN WHEN YOU’RE DINING WITH OTHERS37ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: CHALLENGE 2 4142CHALLENGE 3: GET ENOUGH EXERCISEREGULAR PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IS IMPORTANT FORHEALTH AND PERFORMANCE 43REVIEW YOUR SMART GOALS 45SMART GOALS PLANNER 462GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

SMART GOALS PLANNER WORKSHEET 47PLAN YOUR WORKOUTS WITH BLOCK PERIODIZATION48CARDIO PLANNER 50WEIGHT-TRAINING PLANNER 52GUIDE TO NUTRIENT TIMING 53ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: CHALLENGE 3 5455CHECK-IN56CHALLENGE 4: GET 7–8 HOURS OF SLEEP EACH NIGHTTHE “WEIGHT” OF POOR SLEEP 57SLEEP & PERFORMANCE 5910 SLEEP HABITS TO HELP YOU LOSE WEIGHT61DO YOUR EATING HABITS KEEP YOU AWAKE?63COMPLETE A SLEEP DIARY 65SLEEP, EXERCISE, AND WEIGHT MANAGEMENT67ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: CHALLENGE 4 6869CHALLENGE 5: MANAGE YOUR STRESSHOW DOES YOUR STRESS MINDSET AFFECT WEIGHT LOSS?71MAKE STRESS YOUR ALLY 73RELAXATION RESPONSE: HOW TO DEAL WITH UNHEALTHY STRESS75TRACK YOUR RELAXATION RESPONSE SKILLS77MINDFUL EATING FOR WEIGHT LOSS 78ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: CHALLENGE 5 813GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

I N T R OD U C T IONIf you’ve ever worried you might not make weight or pass your fitness test, this guide’s for you.What makes this weight-loss guide different from other tools? It encourages you to look at how differentaspects of your life contribute to your weight and overall health in ways you might not expect.For example, eating an apple instead of a piece of cake might seem like an obvious choice when you wantto lose weight. But consider other factors beyond diet: What kinds of social settings are you in? Are youfeeling more stressed or anxious than usual? Are you getting enough sleep?HOW IT WORKSThis guide contains 5 challenges. Start with Challenge 1 so you can set a few things as a baseline. Thenfeel free to skip around and take on challenges as you like. You might want to improve just one or 2 areasrather than all 5. Or you might prioritize one challenge over another.There’s no specific timeline to complete the challenges, but 3 months is a good place to start. You’ll beprompted to set your goals and timelines as you go.You’ll also want to use the “Check-in” section. (It’s between Challenges 3 and 4 but meant to be used atwhatever point you want. That way you can assess how you’re feeling and make adjustments as needed.)BOTTOM LINEHealthy, sustainable weight loss isn’t just about diet and exercise or quick fixes. Find out how you canoptimize various factors that affect your health, so you can reach peak performance.Use the links below to visit the Challenges (and the Check-in page)and get on your way to a healthy weight.CHALLENGE 1: Assess your habitsCHALLENGE 2: Create a one-week meal planCHALLENGE 3: Get enough exerciseCHECK-INCHALLENGE 4: Get 7–8 hours of sleep each nightCHALLENGE 5: Manage your stress4GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

C H A LLEN G E 1 :ASS E SS YOU R H A B ITSYour first challenge, should you choose to accept it, is to assess your current health habits as they relate tosleep, stress, exercise, and diet. The rest of the challenges can be completed in any order, but it’s important to start with this one. You’ll be able to use this workbook more effectively—and ultimately achieve yourweight-loss goals—if you first identify your strengths and areas for improvement and then set a solid goal.The first part of Challenge 1 is to record your habits for a week. Use the habits tracking sheet in the Taskssection below to record 4 things every day for one week: How many hours of sleep did you get last night? (Shoot for 7–8 hours.) How much exercise or physical activity did you get today? (Aim for 30 minutes of moderate exercise.) How many fruits and vegetables did you eat today? (Aim for 4–5 servings each day.) How would you describe your mood today?At the end of the week, assess how you did. Compare your resultsto the recommendations on the tracking sheet. Where did you fallshort? What areas can you improve on? In some cases there isn’tnecessarily a right answer, such as how you felt on a given day.The goal isn’t to be perfect with every habit every day but to be mindful of your health habits and make small adjustments where you can.Once you’ve reviewed your habits, set up SMART goals to look forareas of improvement so you’re more likely to achieve your weightloss goals.SpecificMeasurableAchievable or ActionableRelevantTime sensitiveRather than just saying “I want to lose weight,” SMART goals helpyou map out how you’ll get there. A good SMART goal mightsound like, “I will lose 15 pounds in the next 12 weeks by startingto implement healthier choices, because I need to pass my PT test.”5GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

You’ll set other SMART goals along the way to help you achieve your primary weight-loss goal, but thisis a good start. Use the SMART-goal worksheet in the Tasks list below to help you set up your initialweight-loss goal before you get started on the other challenges. This will establish a starting point for anychanges—large or small—you want to make to improve your health.TASKS TO ACHIEVE CHALLENGE 1: Create new habits to help you lose weight. Track your habits so you can tailor your weight-loss goals. Get smart about setting goals—and reap the rewards. Use this worksheet to set your SMART goals for weight loss. Learn a few tips to help build your motivation to lose weight. Find additional resources to build good weight management habits.6GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

CREATE NEW HABITS TO HELP YOU LOSE WEIGHTThe beginning of any new situation—such a new duty station, a birthday, the start of a new year, a newrole, or the start of a weight-loss plan—is a great time to set new goals. When you create a habit to helpachieve your goal, your behavior is more likely to stick! For example, if you work really hard to lose 10pounds, but you don’t make healthy eating and exercise a habit, it’s likely you’ll gain back the weight. Trythese 4 strategies to help you develop new habits to reach—and keep—your goals.1. Make it simple. The first mistake you might make when trying to develop a new habit is tothink you can rely on willpower. Sometimes you’re really motivated, but other days you justwant to sit on the couch. Your motivation might change based on your mood, the weather, andother factors. One way to help overcome the shifts in motivation is to break the new habit intosmaller, manageable pieces.For example, say you want to start running every day when you get home. Instead of trying to run for30 minutes, start with the goal of 5 minutes. When your motivation is low you can push through just5 minutes of running. When your motivation is higher, you’ll likely run longer. The goal is to make iteasy to get started. Once you’ve gotten into the routine of running 5 minutes each night, it’ll be easierto add time, and eventually build up to your goal of running 30 minutes per night.Try the WOOP—Wish, Outcome, Obstacle, Plan—strategy tohelp you increase your willpower and generate the energy andmotivation you need to achieve your goals.2. Set up your environment for success. Another way tohelp create a new habit is to set up your environmentso it’s easier to achieve your goal and harder to do thethings that get in your way.For example, say one of the main obstacles to exercising eachday after work is that you normally like to sit and relax on yourcouch when you get home. One solution: before you leave inthe morning, put your running clothes on the couch where younormally sit as a gentle reminder. Or pack your workout gear tobring with you to work to encourage you to exercise before youget home.3. Build on routines you already have. Another part ofstarting a new habit is remembering to do it. This mightseem easy, but the stresses of life can make it hard toremember to work on your new “habit.” Setting alarmsor making reminders can be effective, but it’s even easierif you link the new habit to a routine you already do.For example, if you want to be more grateful, each night at dinner ask everyone at the table to share 3 things they’re gratefulfor. If you want to lose weight, do 15 squats after each time youbrush your teeth. When creating a new habit, try to build yournew action into a routine you already have.7GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

4. Enjoy the process. If you can’t get yourself to do the new “habit” at first, don’t lose hope.Developing habits is often a trial-and error-process. Learn from your mistakes. If one thingdoesn’t work, try something else. Maybe you can break down the habit to make it simpler orfind a different routine to connect it to. And try to enjoy the process! If your desired habitis to eat cookies every day, it’s likely you’ll succeed in no time, because eating cookies is fun.(But you won’t lose much weight!)Find a way to make every new habit fun: Congratulate yourself after each success; don’t beat yourself up after each failure.To learn more ways to accomplish your goals, watch HPRC’s video Falling Forward: 6 Ways to Recoverfrom Setbacks.BOTTOM LINECreating new habits is a great way to set yourself up for long-term success in accomplishing new goals.These 4 strategies—making the habit simple, setting up your environment for success, building on currentroutines, and finding ways to enjoy the process—can help you reach your goals more easily.REFERENCESFogg, B. J. (2009). The behavior grid: 35 years behavior can change. Paper presented at the Persuasive 2009, 4th International Conference on Persuasive Technology, Claremont, CA.Fogg, B. J. (2009). A behavior model for persuasive design. Paper presented at the Persuasive 2009, 4th InternationalConference on Persuasive Technology, Claremont, CA.Fogg, B. J., & Hreha, J. (2010). Behavior wizard: A method for matching target behaviors with solutions. Paper presented at the Persuasive 2010, International Conference on Persuasive Technology, Copenhagen, Denmark.Wood, W., & Rünger, D. (2016). Psychology of habit. Annual Review of Psychology, 67(1), 289–314. doi:10.1146/annurev-psych-122414-0334178GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

HABITS TRACKERTracking your habits on the worksheet below can help you know where to start when you want to changethe way you approach a particular task. Print and use it to get going. Good luck! Use this worksheet tokeep track of your sleep, exercise, eating, and mood.Example:How many hours of sleepdid you get last night?(Aim for 7–8.)How much exercise and/or physical activity didyou get today? (Aim for30 minutes of moderateexercise 4–7 days perweek.)How many fruits andvegetables did you eattoday? (Shoot for 4–5servings of each.)How would you describeyour mood today?7 hours (11 p.m.–6 a.m.)30-minute run1-mile walk with the dogPlayed outside with kids for25 minutes before dinner1/2 grapefruit for breakfastApple with peanut butterfor snackDid a mindfulness meditationafter breakfast to get focusedfor the day.1 cup broccoli with lunch1 cup green beans with dinnerLeft work in time to get to mychild’s recital.Felt very happy to spend timewith the family.MONTUESWEDTHURSFRISATSUN9GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

GET SMART ABOUT SETTING GOALSGoal setting can be a useful tool in many arenas. Nearly 90% of the time, setting specific and challenginggoals leads to better performance than “do your best” goals or none at all. Goals can direct attention,mobilize effort, increase persistence, and help you form solid strategies.Writing down your weight-loss goals can help you to achieve them. In addition, setting goals using astandardized method, such as the one described here, can help you stick with and feel you can accomplishthose goals.Set your weight-loss goals using the “SMART” goals technique (Specific, Measurable, Achievable orAction-oriented, Relevant, Time-sensitive).SPECIFICSpecific goals leave no room for doubt. For example, setting a goal to do better on your fitness tests mightfeel too large or vague. Instead, break it up into more narrowly focused targets, such as “I want to improvemy APFT run time.”MEASURABLEDecide how you’ll measure whether you’ve met a specific goal. Forexample, you might want to shave 40 seconds off your APFT 2-milerun time (5 seconds off each quarter mile). Achievable goals like thisserve as great milestones because they fuel motivation to set highgoals and commit to them.ACHIEVABLE OR ACTION-ORIENTEDSet achievable, action-oriented goals by paying attention to thelanguage you use. Rather than using words such as “I’ll try to shave40 seconds from my time” (you might not) or even “I will shave off40 seconds” (at some point in the future), say to yourself “I amshaving 40 seconds off my time” (that is, right now).RELEVANTSet goals that are relevant for you. 40 seconds might be impossible ifyou’re already in top shape, or it might not be practical now if you’rein poor condition. But it could be just right if you’re reasonably fitbut have room to improve. It will be easier to stay engaged and feelrewarded in the process when you set goals that fit what is bothimportant and possible for you at the current time.10GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

TIME-SENSITIVECreate goals that are time-oriented for your overall goal and for the important sub-goals that can help youreach your larger goal.Overall goal: Some improvements, especially ones related to long-term physical fitness, are dependent onindividual factors, so the exact timeline will vary from person to person. For example, you might set a timeframe to improve your run time by 40 seconds in 8 weeks, whereas your friend might set the same goalover a 12-week time frame. Quantifying a time frame for the process allows you to set a realistic schedulearound your performance goals.Sub-goals: Both performance goals and process goals can serve as sub-goals or benchmarks formonitoring progress toward your overall goals. Performance goals, such as shaving 5 seconds per weekoff your time, allow you to compare your performance between past and present rather than focus onyour rank compared to others. Process goals are the important steps you take to accomplish your desiredperformance; they can be a bit more subjective but can still be quantified. For example, you might say, “I’mgoing to stick to my training schedule over the next 2 weeks. I will run at the designated time each day andfollow through with recovery, with only one day I can reschedule.” By breaking down a larger goal intospecific, smaller goals that can be accomplished in the near future, you’re more likely to move toward yourlarger goal step by step.A word of caution with SMART goals: Don’t let them stifle innovation! If you set goals that are too rigid,you could keep yourself “in the box” rather than allowing yourself to take the risks required for big newideas to develop. You want to find the right balance.The examples above are about achieving optimal physical performance, but these tips can help you setSMART goals across all your pursuits! Use the worksheet on the next pages to help you set your SMARTgoals for weight loss.11GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

SMART GOALS PLANNERGoal setting can be an important performance skill, but make sure you’re setting SMART goals.Completing this checklist will help.SPECIFIC. What exactly is your goal? Be specific about what you wish to accomplish.MEASURABLE. Decide how you will measure whether you have met your goal. Quantify success sothat you’re able to monitor and enjoy your progress.ACHIEVABLE/ACTION-ORIENTED. What language do you use? Think “I am” rather than“I’ll try” or “I will.” Make sure your goal is something you can achieve in the time frame you set.RELEVANT. Does this goal make sense for you? Be realistic, but also challenge yourself.TIME-SENSITIVE. What is the time frame? Can you break it down into a long-term overall goal,with subgoals as steps that lead there?Look at the example for each area and fill in your own statements in the space provided on a blankworksheet.Date 1/31/2020SpecificI want to lose 10 pounds by my next PFT.MeasurableLose 1 pound per week for the next 10 weeks.Achievable/Action-orientedI’m going to keep track of my caloric intake and expenditure to make sure I’m at a deficit of at least 500calories per day.RelevantI need to do this for my health and military performance.Time-sensitive(Overall goal)I am losing 10 pounds in 10 weeks.(Sub-goal)I will track my calories and food choices for the next 3 weeks and reassess my progress.12GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

SMART GOALS entedRelevantTime-sensitive(Overall tion-orientedRelevantTime-sensitive(Overall tion-orientedRelevantTime-sensitive(Overall goal)(Sub-goal)13GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

3 STRATEGIES TO BUILD MOTIVATION FORLOSING WEIGHTWho is the most motivated, passionate person you know or admire, whose dedication inspires you?What is it that empowers them to be so dedicated? What helps them push through when they’re tired?What’s the “why” behind their efforts?Chances are your answer isn’t “to lose weight to fit into a new outfit for vacation,” or “to get a raise.”Motivation based on awards, punishments, or achieving a desired outcome—called extrinsic motivation—can be great in the short term, but it doesn’t usually last. When the season changes and the special eventis over, or the reward is in hand, the motivation to sustain the behavior drops. That’s why it’s often hard tostay motivated to lose weight after you meet this type of goal.More likely, what motivates the person you thought of is “they love what they do,” “they want to make adifference in the world,” “they’re inspired by their faith,” or “it’s just who they are.” These are examples ofintrinsic motivation, when you’re motivated from within to behave driven by what you enjoy, how youdefine yourself, or what connects to your values. Unfortunately, many goals, including weight loss, requireyou to do tasks you’re not intrinsically motivated to do. The following strategies can help you increase yourlong-term motivation to accomplish your goals.BUILD ON YOUR SELF-IDENTITYDo you know someone who—no matter the situation, how much sleep they get, or how bad theweather is—will not miss their 5-mile morning run and has an “Eat, Sleep, Run, Repeat” T-shirt?Or do you know someone who loves yoga or CrossFit who describes themselves on social media asa “yogi” or posts their WOD (workout of the day)results? One reason to explain these T-shirts orsocial media posts relates to increasing motivation.Self-identifying with a particular behavior is anincredibly powerful motivator. The behavior justbecomes “what you do.” The decision to either gofor a run or watch TV is already made because“I’m a runner!”If you don’t already self-identify with a healthybehavior to reach your goals, you can try todevelop one. For example, if you want to startdrinking water instead of soda, start saying toyourself when tempted with soda, “I’m a water drinker,” or “I don’t drink soda.” It might seem odd at first,but the more you say it, and do the desired behavior to back it up, the more likely this will become part ofhow you see yourself.14GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

CONNECT TO YOUR VALUESIf making “water drinker” a part of your identity feels off to you, try another strategy: Connect thebehavior to a core value you already have. For example, if you value “being a great parent and rolemodel to my kids,” you can leverage that value by reflecting on how a healthy lifestyle helps you live outthat value, such as “having more energy helps me be more present,” or “living longer will let me be therefor my kids longer.” When you’re challenged to choose water over soda, you can now reflect on how important being a good parent is to you for the push you need.To help identify your core values, read HPRC’s Azimuth check: Are you living your values?LEARN YOUR SIGNATURE STRENGTHSSignature strengths are character traits that make you feel energized, motivated, and true to yourself. Youfeel at your best when you are using your signature strengths. Finding ways to use your signature strengthsto act in the ways needed to accomplish your goal will increase your motivation and performance, andhelp you to enjoy those behaviors. For example, if one of your signature strengths is curiosity, you couldchange your morning run to explore different areas. If you’re creativeand playful, you could come up with different games to play duringyour run; it could be as simple as how many pigeons you can spotduring each run.By finding a way to use your signature strengths, you’re helping tomake the desired behavior part of what you do, rather than goingagainst your nature. A simple shift can be a major improvement toyour motivation.MOVING FORWARDOnce you’ve reviewed the 3 strategies, choose at least one to try toincrease your motivation. Try it for a couple weeks and if it doesn’twork, try another. Discovering how to motivate yourself is often atrial-and-error journey. As you learn what really motivates you, youcan apply it to many aspects of your life.15GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

REFERENCESForest, J., Mageau, G. A., Crevier-Braud, L., Bergeron, É., Dubreuil, P., & Lavigne, G. L. (2012). Harmonious passionas an explanation of the relation between signature strengths’ use and well-being at work: Test of an intervention program. Human Relations, 65(9), 1233–1252. doi:10.1177/0018726711433134Silva, M. N., Markland, D., Minderico, C. S., Vieira, P. N., Castro, M. M., Coutinho, S. R., . & Teixeira, P. J. (2008). Arandomized controlled trial to evaluate self-determination theory for exercise adherence and weight control:rationale and intervention description. BMC Public Health, 8(1), 234. doi:10.1186/1471-2458-8-234Silva, M. N., Vieira, P. N., Coutinho, S. R., Minderico, C. S., Matos, M. G., Sardinha, L. B., & Teixeira, P. J. (2010). Using self-determination theory to promote physical activity and weight control: a randomized controlled trialin women. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 33(2), 110-122. doi.org/10.1007/s10865-009-9239-yStrachan, S. M., Fortier, M. S., Perras, M. G., & Lugg, C. (2013). Understanding variations in exercise-identitystrength through identity theory and self-determination theory. International Journal of Sport and ExercisePsychology, 11(3), 273-285. doi.org/10.1080/1612197X.2013.749005Vlachopoulos, S. P., Kaperoni, M., & Moustaka, F. C. (2011). The relationship of self-determination theory variablesto exercise identity. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 12(3), 265-272. doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2010.11.00616GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: CHALLENGE 1Find more resources on how to assess your current health habits.Calculate calories from foods: Calorie Control CouncilEstimate nutrient needs: USDA: DRI calculatorFood-diary apps to keep you on trackNIH body weight plannerTrack eating: 3-day food recordUSDA: MyPlate plan17GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

C H A LLEN G E 2 :C RE AT E A O NE-W EE K MEA L P LA NDo you really have time to make healthy meals in your busy life of job and military duties, family obligations, social activities, and trying to sleep 8 hours and exercise regularly? Yes, you do! When you investsome time each week into planning, shopping for, and preparing your meals, you’re investing in yourhealth, performance, and readiness.Consider the benefits of cooking at home: It leads to a higher-quality diet, which typically leads to better health and weight. It costs less than eating out or ordering takeout. You can control the ingredients and portions—especially important if you’re focusing onweight loss. It’s a great way to connect with friends and family. It can be really fun!If you share a kitchen with family, friends, or roommates, have themjoin in your meal-planning efforts. They can help you decide what tocook, pick new ingredients or recipes to try (quinoa or eggplant), orshare the cooking or clean-up duties.Keep in mind that even if you don’t plan to cook most of your mealsat home, creating a meal plan for the week is a great way to help youachieve your weight goals. If “taco Tuesday” is a meal you like to stopfor on your way home from work, look for ways to eat lighter therest of the day to balance out the extra chips and salsa (and possiblya beer or margarita)! You might also decide to make favorite takeoutmeals at home so you can have more control over the ingredientsand portions.Remember, most people tend to default to the quickest and easiestoptions. So, make sure balanced, high-nutrient meals are yourdefault. Planning ahead can decrease stress—and create leftoversfor the next day.18GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

TASKS TO ACHIEVE CHALLENGE 2: Find out what makes a “healthy” weight-loss eating plan. Consider the pros and cons of popular eating styles. How to use a hunger scale for healthier habits. Learn how to eat to fuel your performance. Learn more about fad diet red flags. Read our sample grocery list—then write your own. Practice smart grocery shopping on a budget. Review our sample 7-day meal plan—then create your own. Arm yourself for success with these 6 tips for your wellness mission. Get tips on making healthy choices when you’re out. Read more about how to create and follow solid eating habits.19GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

WHAT IS A “HEALTHY” WEIGHT-LOSSEATING PLAN, ANYWAY?With food hype in the media flip-flopping over high carb vs. low carb and high fat vs. low fat, it can behard to know what is the “right” way to eat. Is it eating like a caveman? Is it giving up carbs to go intoketosis? Or eating only plants? What’s the best way to eat for health or performance? What about whenyou want to lose weight because your health, promotion, or even career depend on it?Weight loss sounds simple: Take less “energy in” (fuel from food and drinks, measured in calories) anduse more “energy out” (calories burned through daily physical activity and exercise). Your body will burnthrough the stored energy (fat), and you’ll lose weight. But it isn’t quite that easy, because many otherfactors are involved in managing your weight; some you can control and others you can’t.One factor you can control (most of the time, anyway) is the type and amount of food you eat. Notevery eating style is right for you at every time. (See Pros and cons of popular eating styles in this Challengeto learn more.) Travel, deployment, and training might limit your ability to choose the foods you wantbecause the available options are limited or you’re on a different schedule. Also, the eating pattern youlike might not be appropriate at particular times, such as when the demands of high-intensity training ora mission might mean your weight-loss eating style can result in underfueling, or when injury or healthissues have special nutrient demands. Less energy intake (fewer calories) doesn’t always mean less food.Choosing different types of foods or eating patterns also can help you succeed in managing your weight.Your eating pattern or style might change depending on changes in your lifestyle, health, or fitness goals.One style might work better for you during intense training or operations (see Eat to fuel your performance in this Challenge), while another might work better during a temporary or transition setting (PCS,deployment), so you might need to adjust. Finding an eating pattern that works might take some trial anderror. However, it’s important to consider a variety of nutritional and lifestyle factors to help you choosethe eating pattern that best fits: Your lifestyle and schedule Your tastes and food preferences Your unique metabolism“Unique metabolism” refers to the way your body works, including how you metabolize foodand how factors such as your activity level, genetics, and environment impact your nutrientneeds. Other factors that affect your individual metabolism—a concept called “biochemicalindividuality”—are still being discovered.20GET INTO FIGHTING WEIGHT: A TOTAL FORCE FITNESS GUIDE

BASICS OF A LIFELONG EATING PLANNutritional considerations Eat whole or “true” foods: Choose foods that are minimally processed, close to theiroriginal state, or still resemble their original sources. Eat mostly plants, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and beans. Maximize nutrients: Choose foods and beverages packed with naturally occurringnutrients, antioxidants, and phytochemicals. Antioxidants are substances that can prevent or delay cell damage. Phytochemicals are compounds found in plants that can promote health. Avoid empty calories, foods that mightf

5 challenge 1: assess your habits create new habits to help you lose weight 7 habits tracker 9 get smart about setting goals 10 smart goals planner 12 smart goals planner 13 3 strategies to build motivation for losing weight 14 additional resources: c