2.1. Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs)

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2-1NPDES Permit Writers’ Manual for CAFOsChapter22. AFOs and CAFOs2.1. Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs)When Congress passed the CWA in 1972, it specifically included the term concentrated animalfeeding operation in the definition of point source. CWA § 502(14). Before EPA defined the CWAterm concentrated animal feeding operations in the 1976 CAFO regulations, the 1974 ELGs forthe Feedlots Point Source Category, formerly 40 CFR part 412.11(b), defined a feedlot to mean “aconcentrated, confined animal or poultry growing operation for meat, milk or egg production,or stabling, in pens or houses wherein the animals or poultry are fed at the place of confinementand crop or forage growth or production is not sustained in the area of confinement.” Similarly,the support documentation for the ELG [see, for example, EPA’s Development Document for theFinal Revisions to the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Regulation and the EffluentGuidelines for Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation, EPA-821-R-03-001 (2002)] distinguishedbetween animals grown in feedlots and those grown in non-feedlot situations. The developmentdocument defines feedlot using the following three conditions:1. A high concentration of animals held in a small area for periods in conjunction withone of the following purposes:a. Production of meat.b. Production of milk.c. Production of eggs.d. Production of breeding stock.e. Stabling of horses.2. The transportation of feed to animals for consumption.3. By virtue of the confinement of animals or poultry, the land or area will neither sustainvegetation nor be available for crop or forage.

2-2NPDES Permit Writers’ Manual for CAFOsIn 1976 EPA revised its regulations in response to a court case holding that EPA could notexempt certain categories of point sources from NPDES permit requirements. NRDC v. Train,396 F. Supp. 1393 (D.D.C. 1975), aff’d NRDC v. Costle, 586 F.2d 1369 (D.C. Cir. 1977).The revisedregulations refer to CAFOs rather than feedlots. 41 FR 11458 (March 18, 1976). The 1976 ruledefined which facilities were CAFOs, and therefore point sources under the CWA, and establishedpermitting requirements for CAFOs. Id. EPA’s 1976 definition of CAFO draws on the definition ofa CAFO from the 1974 feedlot definition. Although the definition of the term CAFO was furtherrevised in the 2003 CAFO regulations, the types of facilities covered by the definition are nearlyidentical to those in the original definition of a feedlot.A facility must first meet the definition of an AFO before it can be considered a CAFO. AFOs aredefined as, “operations where animals have been, are, or will be stabled or confined and fed ormaintained for a total of 45 days or more in any 12-month period and where vegetation is notsustained in the confinement area during the normal growing season.” 40 CFR § 122.23(b)(1).EPA interprets maintained to mean that the animals are confined in the same area where wasteis generated or concentrated. Areas where animals are maintained can include areas whereanimals are fed and areas where they are watered, cleaned, groomed, milked, or medicated. Foran overview of the livestock industry, see Chapter 4 of the Technical Development Document forthe 2003 CAFO regulations.Regulatory CitationAnimal feeding operation (AFO) means a lot or facility (other than an aquatic animalproduction facility) where the following conditions are met:Animals have been, are or will be stabled or confined and fed or maintained for atotal of 45 days or more in any 12-month period.ANDCrops, vegetation, forage growth, or post-harvest residues are not sustained in thenormal growing season over any portion of the lot or facility.40 CFR § 122.23(b)(1)The first part of the regulatory definition of an AFO means that animals must be kept on the lot orfacility for a minimum of 45 days in a 12-month period. If an animal is confined for any portion ofa day, it is considered to be on the facility for a full day. For example, dairy cows that are broughtin from pasture for less than an hour to be milked are counted as being confined (i.e., on the lotor facility) for the day. In addition, the same animals are not required to remain on the lot for45 days or more for the operation to be defined as an AFO. Rather, the first part of the regulatorydefinition is met if some animals are fed or maintained on the lot or facility for 45 days out ofany 12-month period. The 45 days do not have to be consecutive, and the 12-month period doesnot have to correspond to the calendar year. For example, June 1 to the following May 31 wouldconstitute a 12-month period. Therefore, animal operations such as stockyards, fairgrounds, andauction houses where animals may not be fed, but are confined temporarily, may be AFOs.2. AFOs and CAFOs2.1. Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs)2.2. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs)

2-3NPDES Permit Writers’ Manual for CAFOsThe second part of the regulatory definition of an AFO distinguishes confinement areas frompasture or grazing land. That part of the definition relates to the portion of the facility whereanimals are confined and where natural forage or planted vegetation does not occur duringthe normal growing season. Confinement areas might have some vegetative growth along theedges while animals are present or during months when animals are kept elsewhere. If a facilitymaintains animals in an area without vegetation, such as dirt lots with incidental vegetativegrowth, the facility meets the second part of the AFO definition.True pasture and rangeland operations are not considered AFOs because animals at thoseoperations are generally maintained in areas that sustain crops or forage growth during thenormal growing season. In some pasture-based operations, animals can freely wander in and outof areas for food or shelter; that is not considered confinement. In general, an area is a pastureif vegetation is maintained during the normal growing season. However, pasture and grazingbased operations can also have confinement areas (e.g., feedlots, barns, milking parlors, pens)that meet the definition of an AFO.Incidental vegetation in a clear area of confinement would not exclude an operation from meetingthe definition of an AFO. In the case of a winter feedlot, the second part of the AFO definition(i.e., no vegetation) is meant to be evaluated during the winter, when the animals are confined.Animals from a grazing operation can be confined during winter months in a confinement areathat had vegetation during other parts of the year. If the animals are confined for more than45 days but not year-round and vegetation emerges in the spring when animals are removed, thepresence of vegetation does not prevent that feedlot from being defined as an AFO because thevegetation is growing when animals are not present. In that example, the feedlot will not sustainthe vegetation that had emerged in spring once the animals are moved back into the feedlot.Therefore, the facility in the example meets the definition of an AFO.Winter feeding of cattle. (Photo courtesy of USDA/NRCS)2. AFOs and CAFOs2.1. Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs)2.2. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs)

2-4NPDES Permit Writers’ Manual for CAFOsIs this animal production operation an AFO?Example A: An operation confines its animals for 10-day intervals every month for 5 months.The animals are kept in an enclosure with slot floors.Answer: The operation meets the AFO definition because it confines animals for a total of50 days (i.e. more than 45 days) in a 12-month period, and the confinement area has slotfloors and therefore sustains no vegetation.Example B: An operation confines mature animals in pens of five each. It has 200 pens perbuilding and five buildings. The animals are confined year-round.Answer: The operation is an AFO because it confines animals for 45 days or more and doesnot sustain vegetation in the confinement area.Example C: An operation raises beef cattle in a 5,000-acre pasture from April 1 throughNovember 30 each year. From December 1 through March 3, the cattle are confined by afence to a 10-acre area. The animals are not free to move between the temporary confinementarea and the pasture area. The growing season for the area in which the operation is locatedis from May 1 through October 15. A site visit is made to the operation during January, andthe 10-acre area where the animals are confined has vegetation on less than 5 percent ofthe ground; the other areas are barren soil or packed manure. The confinement area wascompletely covered by vegetation during a prior visit to the operation during August.Answer: While the operation is pasture-based for most of the year, it meets the definitionof an AFO. The animals are held in confinement for more than 45 days, and the vegetationhas been denuded to the point that it is incidental while the animals are in confinement.The fact that the vegetation reestablishes itself some time after the animals have beenreleased from confinement does not change the fact that the winter confinement results inthe operation meeting the definition of an AFO.Example D: A beef cattle operation maintains the herd on pastures from March 15 throughNovember 15. From November 16 through March 14, the herd is moved to a fenced fieldwhere crops were grown during the spring and summer. During the winter, while the animalsare confined to the field, the animals eat all the post-harvest residue and other vegetation thatremained in the field after the crops were harvested. Additional feed is also brought to thefield to sustain the herd throughout the winter.Answer: The operation meets the AFO definition. The animals are confined and fed for morethan 45 days in a 12-month period (November through March). Although the confinementarea is used for crop production during times when the animals are grazing on pasture, thevegetation is not sustained during the period when the animals are confined there.Example E: An operation raises beef cattle in a 10,000-acre pasture rangeland. In the winter,food is brought to various locations in the pasture rangeland to sustain the animals. The areaimmediately around the food supply is rendered barren of vegetation. However, the animalshave full access to the pasture area.Answer: The operation is not an AFO because the animals are free to move within the entirepasture, and the vegetation is sustained in pasture areas.2. AFOs and CAFOs2.1. Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs)2.2. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs)

2-5NPDES Permit Writers’ Manual for CAFOsIs this animal production operation an AFO? (continued)Example F: An operation raises beef cattle in a 2,000-acre pasture. In the winter, the animalscongregate in a smaller area (e.g., 100 acres), and have access to a creek as their primarysource of water. The area immediately around the creek is rendered barren of vegetation whenthe animals are present. The barren area constitutes approximately 10 percent of the 100-acrewintering area. The remainder of the 100 acres retains vegetative cover.Answer: The operation is not an AFO because vegetation is sustained in the confinementarea while the animals are present. While the practices at the operation do not result init meeting the definition of an AFO, the practices are not protective of water quality. EPAwould encourage such an operation to provide an alternative water source to keep theanimals out of the creek to reduce potential water quality impacts.Example G: An operation raises cattle on pasture; however, a number of the cattle areconfined for birthing each spring. The confinement area is a dirt-floored pen that has onlyincidental vegetation along the edges and in some small areas in the pen. The animals are inthe pen for 90 days each spring.Answer: The operation meets the AFO definition. The animals are confined and fed for morethan 45 days, and the vegetation in the confinement area is only incidental.Example H: An operation raises cattle on pasture; however, as part of the rotational grazingprogram the cattle frequently are moved between smaller, fenced pasture areas. Cattle movebetween pastures in narrow laneways that are largely devoid of vegetation. The barren areaconstitutes less than 10 percent of the pasture areas, and the remainder of the acres retainsvegetative cover year-round. The animals are not fed or watered in the laneways and areprevented from congregating in the laneways by gates and fencing.Answer: The operation does not meet the AFO definition. The animals are not confined inthe laneways that are devoid of vegetation.2.2. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs)This section provides information to help identify which AFOs are CAFOs. An AFO is a CAFO ifit meets the regulatory definition of a Large or Medium CAFO, 40 CFR parts 122.23 (b)(4) or (6),or has been designated as a CAFO, 40 CFR part 122.23(c), by the NPDES permitting authority orby EPA (see Section 2.2.8). Note that some authorized states have adopted regulatory definitionsfor CAFOs that are more inclusive and, therefore, broader in scope than EPA’s regulations. Thosefacilities are subject to requirements under state law but not under federal law.2.2.1. Types of Animal Operations Covered by CAFORegulationsThe CAFO regulations define a Large CAFO on the basis of the number of animals confined.Medium CAFOs are defined as meeting specific criteria in addition to the number of animalsconfined, and those criteria are discussed in Section 2.2.5. The animal types with specific2. AFOs and CAFOs2.1. Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs)2.2. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs)2.2.1. Types of Animal Operations Covered by CAFO Regulations

2-6NPDES Permit Writers’ Manual for CAFOsthreshold numbers for the Large and Medium size categories identified in the regulations arecattle, dairy cows, veal calves, swine, chickens, turkeys, ducks, horses, and sheep. Chapter 4 of theTechnical Development Document for the 2003 CAFO rule provides descriptions of those animaltypes and their associated operations. An AFO that meets the small or medium size thresholdscan be designated as a CAFO by the permitting authority if certain criteria are met, including thatthe AFO is determined to be “a significant contributor of pollutants to waters of the United States.”40 CFR § 122.23(c). For further discussion, see Section 2.2.8.2.2.2. Animal Types Not Listed in CAFO RegulationsAn operation confining any animal type (e.g., geese, emus, ostriches, bison, mink, alligators)not explicitly mentioned in the NPDES regulations and for which there are no ELGs is subject toNPDES permitting requirements for CAFOs if (1) it meets the definition of an AFO, and (2) if thepermitting authority designates it as a CAFO. For a discussion of designation, see Section 2.2.8.2.2.3. AFOs Defined as Large CAFOsAn AFO is a Large CAFO if it stables or confines equal to or more than the number of animalsspecified in Table 2-1 for 45 days or more in a 12-month period. The definition of a Large CAFO isbased solely on the number of animals confined.Table 2-1. Large CAFOsNumber ofanimals700Type of animalMature dairy cows, whether milked or dry1,000Veal calves1,000Cattle, other than mature dairy cows or veal calves (Cattle includes but is notlimited to heifers, steers, bulls and cow/calf pairs.)2,500Swine, each weighing 55 pounds or more10,000Swine, each weighing less than 55 pounds500Horses10,000Sheep or lambs55,000Turkeys30,000Laying hens or broilers, if the AFO uses a liquid-manure handling system125,000Chickens (other than laying hens), if the AFO uses other than a liquid-manurehandling system82,000Laying hens, if the AFO uses other than a liquid-manure handling system30,000Ducks, if the AFO uses other than a liquid-manure handling system5,000Ducks, if the AFO uses a liquid-manure handling systemSource: 40 CFR § 122.23(b)(4)2. AFOs and CAFOs2.1. Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs)2.2. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs)2.2.3. AFOs Defined as Large CAFOs

2-7NPDES Permit Writers’ Manual for CAFOsIn determining whether the applicable Large CAFO threshold is satisfied, the number of animalsactually maintained is considered, not the capacity of the operation.Is this operation a Large CAFO?Example A: An operation confines 2,800 mature swine (more than 55 pounds each) in sixhouses. The houses have concrete floors with conveyances to capture manure.Answer: The operation meets the definition of an AFO; it confines animals for more than45 days over a 12-month period and the confinement area does not sustain vegetation. Theoperation is a Large CAFO because it confines more than 2,500 mature swine, a numberthat exceeds the regulatory threshold for a Large CAFO.Example B: A 1,000-head cow/calf operation evenly splits its calving between fall and spring.The animals are generally pastured with the exception of two 60-day periods when the cow/calf pairs are confined for weaning. Because the calving is split, only 500 cow/calves areconfined in any one weaning session.Answer: The operation meets the definition of an AFO because animals are confined for45 days in a 12-month period. Because the operation does not confine 1,000 or moreanimals or cow/calf pairs for more than 45 days, the operation is not defined as a LargeCAFO. The operation could be a Medium CAFO if it meets one of the two discharge criteriafor the Medium CAFO category, or is designated as a CAFO by the permitting authority.Example C: A background yard (raises feeder cattle from the time calves are weaned untilthey are on a finishing ration in the feedlot) has the capacity to hold 1,100 head of cattle. Thefacility operates year-round (animals are confined 365 days a year) and has never confinedmore than 800 head at any time.Answer: The operation meets the definition of an AFO because animals are confined for45 days in a 12-month period on a feedlot where vegetation is not sustained. Because theoperation does not confine 1,000 or more animals at any one time, the operation is notdefined as a Large CAFO. The operation could be a Medium CAFO if it meets one of thetwo discharge criteria for the Medium CAFO category, or is designated as a CAFO by thepermitting authority.2.2.4. Practices Constituting Poultry Operation Liquid-ManureHandlingThe thresholds for chicken and duck AFOs in the CAFO definitions are based on the type oflitter or manure handling system being used. The two systems are either a liquid-manurehandling system or other-than-a-liquid-manure handling system. The animal number thresholdsthat determine whether the system is a CAFO for chicken or duck AFO using a liquid-manurehandling system are lower than the thresholds for CAFOs that use other-than-liquid-manurehandling systems.2. AFOs and CAFOs2.1. Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs)2.2. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs)2.2.4. Practices Constituting Poultry Operation Liquid-Manure Handling

2-8NPDES Permit Writers’ Manual for CAFOsAn AFO is considered to have a liquid-manure handling system if it uses pits, lagoons, flushsystems (usually combined with lagoons), or holding ponds, or has systems such as continuousoverflow watering, where the water comes into contact with manure and litter. In addition,operations that stack or pile manure in areas exposed to precipitation are considered tohave liquid-manure handling systems. That includes operations that remove litter from theconfinement area and stockpile or store it uncovered in remote locations for even one day.However, permitting authorities may authorize some limited period of temporary storage of litterof no more than 15 days that would not result in the facility meeting the definition of a liquidmanure handling system (e.g., where time is needed to allow for contract hauling arrangementsand precipitation does not occur) (USEPA 2003, 3-6). If litter is stockpiled beyond that temporaryperiod, the uncovered stockpile would constitute a liquid-manure handling system, and the lowerCAFO thresholds for chickens and ducks would apply (see Tables 2-1 and 2-2).Wet Lot and Dry Lot Duck OperationsDuck operations are considered to use a liquid-manure handling system if (1) the ducks areraised outside with swimming areas or ponds or with a stream running through an open lot, or(2) the ducks are raised in confinement buildings where fresh or recycled water is used to flushthe manure to a lagoon, pond, or other storage structure. In addition, a duck operation that stacksmanure or litter as described above for other dry poultry operations is considered to have a liquidmanure handling system.Dry-lot duck operations include those that (1) use confinement buildings and handle manure andlitter exclusively as dry material; (2) use a building with a mesh or slatted floor over a concrete pitfrom which manure is scraped into a solid manure storage structure; or (3) use dry bedding on asolid floor. Dry-lot duck operations are generally considered to be “operations that use other thana liquid-manure handling system.”2.2.5. AFOs that Are Medium CAFOsAn AFO is a Medium CAFO if it meets both parts of a two-part definition. The first part addressesthe number of animals confined, and the second part includes specific discharge criteria. Inaddition, a medium-sized AFO can be designated a CAFO by the permitting authority or EPA(see Section 2.2.8). Table 2-2 lists the animal number ranges associated with the Medium CAFOdefinition. If an AFO confines the number of animals listed in Table 2-2 for 45 days or more in a12-month period, it meets the first part of the definition of a Medium CAFO.An AFO meets the discharge criteria for the second part of the Medium CAFO definition ifpollutants are discharged in one of the following ways: Into waters of the U.S. through a man-made ditch, flushing system, or other similarman-made device.2. AFOs and CAFOs2.1. Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs)2.2. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs)2.2.5. AFOs that Are Medium CAFOs

2-9NPDES Permit Writers’ Manual for CAFOs Directly into waters of the U.S. that originate outside the facility and pass over, across, orthrough the facility or otherwise come into direct contact with the confined animals.40 CFR § 122.23(b)(6).Table 2-2. Medium CAFOsNumber ofanimalsType of animal200–699Mature dairy cows, whether milked or dry300–999Veal calves300–999Cattle, other than mature dairy cows or veal calves (Cattle includes but is notlimited to heifers, steers, bulls and cow/calf 99916,500–54,9999,000–29,999Swine, each weighing 55 pounds or moreSwine, each weighing less than 55 poundsHorsesSheep or lambsTurkeysLaying hens or broilers, if the AFO uses a liquid-manure handling system37,500–124,999Chickens (other than laying hens), if the AFO uses other than a liquid-manurehandling system25,000–81,999Laying hens, if the AFO uses other than a liquid-manure handling system10,000–29,999Ducks, if the AFO uses other than a liquid-manure handling system1,500–4,999Ducks, if the AFO uses a liquid-manure handling systemSource: 40 CFR § 122.23(b)(6)The term man-made device means a conveyance constructed or caused by humans thattransports wastes (manure, litter, or process wastewater) to waters of the U.S. (USEPA 1995, 8).Man-made devices include, for example, pipes, ditches, and channels. If human action wasinvolved in creating the conveyance, it is man-made even if natural materials were used to formit. A man-made channel or ditch that was not created specifically to carry animal wastes butnonetheless does so is considered a man-made device. To be defined as a Medium CAFO, theremust be an actual discharge of pollutants to waters of the U.S. However, it is not necessary forthe man-made device to extend the entire distance to waters of the U.S. It is sufficient that thewastes being discharged flow through the man-made device. For example, a culvert could simplyfacilitate the flow of waste water from one side of a road to another (and subsequently into awater of the U.S.) and is a man-made device for the purposes of this provision. Also, a flushingsystem is a man-made device that uses fresh or recycled water to move manure from the point ofdeposition or collection to another location.2. AFOs and CAFOs2.1. Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs)2.2. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs)2.2.5. AFOs that Are Medium CAFOs

2-10NPDES Permit Writers’ Manual for CAFOsDefinition of Production AreaProduction area means that part of an AFO that includes the animal confinement area, the manurestorage area, the raw materials storage area, and the waste containment areas. The animal confinement area includes but is not limited to open lots, housed lots, feedlots, confinement houses, stallbarns, free stall barns, milkrooms, milking centers, cow yards, barnyards, medication pens, walkers,animal walkways, and stables. The manure storage area includes but is not limited to lagoons, runoff ponds, storage sheds, stockpiles, under house or pit storages, liquid impoundments, static piles,and composting piles. The raw materials storage area includes but is not limited to feed silos, silagebunkers, and bedding materials. The waste containment area includes but is not limited to settlingbasins, and areas within berms and diversions, which separate uncontaminated stormwater. Alsoincluded in the definition of production area is any egg-washing or egg-processing facility, and anyarea used in the storage, handling, treatment, or disposal of mortalities.40 CFR § 122.23(b)(8)Tile drains in the production area are another example of a man-made device. Tile drains areunderground pipes that collect subsurface water for transport away from the site. If tile drainsdischarge manure to waters of the U.S. from the production area of a medium-sized AFO, thefacility meets discharge criterion for the Medium CAFO definition and is a Medium CAFO. Anadditional example would be the discharge to waters of the U.S. from a continuous-flow-throughwater trough system.The Medium CAFO definition addresses discharges directly into a water of the U.S., whichoriginate outside the facility and pass over, across, or through the facility or otherwise comeinto direct contact with the confined animals. The discharge criterion is met if animals inconfinement at an AFO can come into direct contact with waters of the U.S. Thus, a streamrunning through the area where animals are confined indicates that there is a direct discharge ofpollutants unless animals are prevented from any direct contact with waters of the U.S.Is this operation a Medium CAFO?Example A: Runoff from an earthen lot with 850 beef cattle, confined for 6 months a year,passes through a settling basin, riser pipe, concrete channel, junction box, and distributionmanifold before flowing by gravity to an area where it infiltrates into the soil and does notreach waters of the U.S.Answer: No. While the system described includes several man-made devices, the operationdoes not meet the definition of a Medium CAFO because the runoff does not enter waters ofthe U.S.Example B: A 400-head beef cattle AFO, operated year-round, has a grassed waterwayinstalled adjacent to the production area that transports contaminated runoff to an open field.There is no surface water in the area where the runoff is transported.Answer: No. While a properly designed grassed waterway is a man-made device, thedischarge does not reach a water of the U.S. If the discharge reached a water of the U.S.,the facility would be a CAFO.2. AFOs and CAFOs2.1. Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs)2.2. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs)2.2.5. AFOs that Are Medium CAFOs

2-11NPDES Permit Writers’ Manual for CAFOs2.2.6. Operations under Common OwnershipUnder the CAFO regulations, two or more AFOs under common ownership are considered oneoperation if, among other things, they adjoin each other (including facilities that are separatedonly by a right-of-way or a public road) or if they use a common area or system for managingwastes. 40 CFR § 122.23(b)(2). For example, operations generally meet the criterion wheremanure, litter, or process wastewater are commingled (e.g., stored in the same pond, lagoon, orpile) or are applied to the same cropland.In determining whether two or more AFOs are under common ownership, the number ofmanagers is not important. Two AFOs could be managed by different people but have a commonowner (e.g., the same family or business entity owns both). For facilities under commonownership that either adjoin each other or use a common area or system for waste disposal, thecumulative number of animals confined is used to determine if the combined operation is a LargeCAFO and is used in conjunction with the discharge criteria in Section 2.2.5 to determine if thecombined operation is a Medium CAFO.Is this operation under Common Ownership?Example: If a single farm has six chicken houses with a total of 125,000 birds, and the housesare managed by two people, is the farm considered a CAFO?Answer: Yes. The chicken houses are part of a single operation and presumably use acommon area or system for the disposal of wastes; therefore, the entire operation is a LargeCAFO. The number of managers is not relevant.2.2.7. Operations with Multiple Animal TypesUnder the CAFO regulations, multiple types of animals are not counted together to determinethe type and size of a CAFO. However, once an operation is defined as a CAFO on the basis of asingle animal type, all the manure generated by all animals confined at the operation are subjectto NPDES requirements. If wastestreams from multiple livestock species subject to differentregulatory requirements are commingled at a CAFO, any NPDES permit for the facility mustinclude the more stringent ELG requirements. 2003 CAFO Rule, 68 FR 7176, 7,195 (Feb. 12, 2003).See Appendix N, References for NPDES Permit Writers.In situations where immature animals (e.g., heifers and swine weigh

a CAFO from the 1974 feedlot definition. Although the definition of the term CAFO was further revised in the 2003 CAFO regulations, the types of facilities covered by the definition are nearly identical to those in the original definition of a feedlot. A facility must first meet the definition