Information Pack - Puppy Contract

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Information packTo be completed by the breeder.ABOUT THE BREEDER1.Contact detailsTitle (Mr, Mrs, Miss etc):First BOUT THE SELLER (if different)2.Contact detailsTitle (Mr, Mrs, Miss etc):First BOUT THE PUPPY’S MOTHER3.Date of birth//204.What is the mother’s microchip number? (15 digits)5.Is the mother registered with a club or society?YesNoState type of registration: (for example,Kennel Club, The Greyhound Studbook)Registration number: AWF and RSPCA 2012–2018Page1 of 17

6.How many caesarean sections has the mother had, including this litter?7.How many litters has the mother had, including this one?8.How old was the mother when she had her first litter?YesWas it on her first season?9.yearsmonthsNoIs the mother up to date with UK vaccinations?If yes, is her vaccination certificate available to view?YesNoYesNo10. When was the mother last treated for worms and which worming product was used?Product used:Date used:11. Has the mother had any surgery to correct features that could be inherited by the puppy?YesNoYesNoIf yes, please give details:ABOUT THE PUPPY’S FATHER12. Owner’s name and addressTitle (Mr, Mrs, Miss etc):First 3. Father’s date of birth//2014. What is the father’s microchip number? (15 digits)15. Is the father registered with a club or society?YesNoState type of registration: (for example,Kennel Club, The Greyhound Studbook)Registration number:16. Has the father had any surgery to correct features that could be inherited by the puppy?If yes, please give details: AWF and RSPCA 2012–2018Page 2 of 17

ABOUT THE PUPPY17. Date of birth//18. Sex:Male20Female19. Colour and distinguishing marksPlease describe the puppy‟scolour and distinguishing marks.20. Is the puppy a specific breed?YesNoIf yes, state the breed.21. Is the puppy a cross-breed?State the breed (or breeds)for each parent, if known.YesNoMother:Father:22. Is the puppy registered with a club or society?YesNoState type of registration: (for example,Kennel Club, The Greyhound Studbook)Registration number:Puppy‟s registered name:23. Is the puppy subject to any Kennel Club endorsements?YesNoIf yes, please list them.24. What is the puppy’s microchip number? (15 digits)If the puppy can‟t be microchipped yet for veterinary reasons, a copy of the signed veterinary certificate should be attached.25. Is the puppy covered by a breeder’s insurance policy?YesNoIf yes, give the following details:Insurance company:Policy number:26. Was the puppy born by caesarean section?Policy expiry date:Yes27. Will the puppy be vaccinated before he/she is sold?NoYesNoIf yes, attach the vaccination record and fill in the date the next vaccination is due. AWF and RSPCA 2012–2018Page 3 of 17

28. Give details of any worming treatments the puppy will have received.Product used:Date used:29. Has the puppy’s tail been docked?YesNoIf yes, a signed docking certificate should be attached.YesNo30. If the puppy has had a health check or been treated by a vet for any reasonplease tick this box and give further details.Date of treatment or check:Type of treatment or check (if you need more space use the extra space given at Question 44.)31. What is the puppy’s current weight?kilogramsgramsDate weight recorded:32. What types of diet is the puppy currently being fed?DryPouched or tinnedHow much is the puppy fed each day?gramsFrozen(If more than one type state how much of each.)State approximate times of day when the puppy is fed:33. Will the buyer be given enough of the puppy’s current food for at least one week?34. Will toilet training be started before the puppy is sold?YesYesNoNoIf yes, where will the puppy be trained to toilet (for example, outside on grass)?35. Where is the puppy kept for most of the time?In a kennelIn a quiet part of the houseIn a part of the house where there is a lot of activity (for example, the kitchen)Other (please describe): AWF and RSPCA 2012–2018Page 4 of 17

36. Before the sale, who will the puppy have interacted with? (Tick whichever apply)Adult malesAdult femalesChildren between four and 10 years oldChildren over 10 years oldChildren under four years old37. Will the puppy have interacted with any of the following? (Tick whichever apply)Other dogs of the same breed or typeDogs of different breeds or typesCatsRabbitsOther animals (state which):38. Will the puppy have experienced any of the following? (Tick whichever apply)Wearing a collar or harnessBeing briefly separated from his or her mother and littermates in the company of peopleBeing in a restricted environment (for example, an indoor kennel)Hearing household noises. For example, washing machine, vacuum cleaner (see box below).Hearing real or recorded noises. For example, fireworks or traffic.Describe these experiences (washing machine, traffic noise and so on):39. Before the sale, will the new owner have the chance to see and interact with any of the following?The puppy‟s mother (this is a legal requirement for licensed breeders in England)The puppy‟s father40. Is the puppy’s pedigree known?Other puppies in the litterYesNoIf yes, is the puppy‟s pedigree certificate attached to this information pack?YesNo41. What is the relationship between the puppy’s parents?UnrelatedDistantly related (for example, second or third cousins)Third degree relatives (first cousins)Unknown42. How inbred is the puppy? See guidance notes for help.State COI or leave blank if unknown. AWF and RSPCA 2012–2018Page 5 of 17

INHERITED CONDITIONS AND SCREENING/DNA TESTS43. Inherited conditions and screening/DNA testsFill in this section to note common or serious inherited conditions in the breed (or breeds) and to record any relatedscreening or DNA tests carried out on the puppy and his/her parents.Please see the guidance notes for where to find information on canine inherited disorders.Information should be completed: For the mother if she is a specific breed or a cross between two specific breeds; For the father if he is a specific breed or a cross between two specific breeds If the puppy is a specific breed or cross between two breeds and tests are available.Mother’s breed or breedsCommon or seriousinherited conditionsin breedScreening orDNA testavailableTest carried out Date of testResultsavailableResultscertificategiven to YesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoTest carried out Date of testResultsavailableIf testing has been carried out and theresults are not available or if testingdoes not apply please state whyFather’s breed or breedsCommon or seriousinherited conditionsin breedScreening orDNA testavailableResultscertificategiven to YesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoTest carried out Date of testResultsavailableIf testing has been carried out and theresults are not available or if testingdoes not apply please state whyPuppy’s breed or breedsCommon or seriousinherited conditionsin breedScreening orDNA testavailableResultscertificategiven to YesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNo AWF and RSPCA 2012–2018If testing has been carried out and theresults are not available or if testingdoes not apply please state whyPage 6 of 17

EXTRA INFORMATION44. Use this space to include any extra information about the puppy. AWF and RSPCA 2018. You may download, print and copy this document but you must not modify it without our priorwritten permission or sell or republish it. AWF and RSPCA 2012–2018Page 7 of 17

Guidance notesABOUT THE BREEDERQ1 & Q2: About the breeder or sellerIt is strongly recommended that you do not buy a puppy from anyone other than the breeder so that you can seethe puppy interacting with his/her mother and siblings in the place where he/she was born and reared.ABOUT THE PUPPY’S MOTHERQ4: What is the mother’s microchip number?Microchipping is the best way for dogs and puppies to be identified and returned to their owners if they get lostor stolen. It is a legal requirement in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland that all dogs over the ageof eight weeks are microchipped.Q6: How many caesarean sections has the mother had, including this litter?A caesarean section is an operation to take the puppies out of the mother when she hasn‟t been able to give birthnaturally. It is a major operation which can cause problems for the mother and puppies.Some breeds and some individual mothers struggle to give birth naturally and may end up needing a caesareanevery time. Vets feel that these dogs should not be bred from. So you should avoid buying puppies from motherswho have had more than one caesarean. This is especially important if the puppy is a female you want to breedfrom, otherwise she may have trouble giving birth herself.In England, licensed breeders must not breed from a dog who has already had two caesarean sections.Q7: How many litters has the mother had, including this one?Pregnancy, birth and rearing puppies all take a lot of energy and work for any mother. She may have problemssuch as difficulty giving birth and poor body condition if her nutritional needs aren‟t met. Mothers should be allowedat least one season between litters. Avoid puppies from mothers that have had many litters, as this may be a signthat the breeder has expected too much from the mother and may also mean that the care and condition of thepuppy might not be ideal either.Q 8: How old was the mother when she had her first litter and was it on her first season?Responsible breeders should not breed from their bitch‟s first season and should not breed from bitches underone year old. This makes sure the mother is fully grown, mature and is as capable as possible of coping withpregnancy and birth. Different breeds mature at different rates, so check with a vet for the appropriate age whenbreeding can start. Breeders who have ignored these laws or guidelines may not be very knowledgeable andcaring about the mother, and as a result the puppy.Q9: Is the mother up to date with UK vaccinations?It is very important that the mother‟s routine vaccinations are up to date. She needs to be vaccinated to make sureher puppies are born with a good immunity to certain deadly diseases. This will keep the puppies healthy until theycan be vaccinated themselves. Homeopathic vaccines should not have been used. Ask your vet if you are notsure what vaccines the mother should have had.Q10: When was the mother last treated for worms and which product was used?Regular worming of the mother, including during pregnancy, is important to make sure the puppies are not borninfested with worms. Ask your vet about how effective the products listed are, and whether they are up to date.Avoid buying from breeders who do not vaccinate or worm their animals adequately. AWF and RSPCA 2012–2018Page 8 of 17

Q11 and Q16: Has either parent had any surgery to correct features that could be inherited by the puppy?Many breeds have been bred to emphasise certain features which over time have become more and moreexaggerated. Although „normal‟ for a breed, flat faces, heavy wrinkles and very floppy ears are just a few examplesof features that may cause problems.For example, dogs with short flat faces often have features that can cause breathing problems, such as narrownostrils and tiny windpipes. They can suffer severe breathing difficulties and may even have difficulty enjoying awalk or playing. Folded or wrinkled skin may be itchy and painful, and infolding eyelids can scratch the eyeball.Some of these problems will require lifelong medication or sometimes surgery, both of which can be costly. Theseproblems can cause significant health and welfare concerns for the dog and affect its quality of life, and can bevery distressing for owners.You should also be told if either parent has had surgery to fix a problem such as eyelids which rubbed on the eye,as this may no longer be obvious, but could still be inherited by the puppy.It‟s important to know whether the parents are affected to give you an idea of how likely the puppy will be to getthe same problems. Speak to your vet about any problems listed.Before you buy a puppy find out which breeds are worst affected and try to avoid them. To find out more, talk toyour vet or visit the following websites: Canine Inherited Disorders Database: www.upei.ca/cidd Get Puppy Smart: www.getpuppysmart.com Dog Breed Health: www.dogbreedhealth.com/Breeders can also ask their vet and should use the websites above when listing the exaggerated features in their breed.ABOUT THE PUPPY’S FATHERQ12: Contact details: owner of the puppy’s fatherThis information can only be included if the owner has given permission for their contact details to be shared witha prospective owner.Q14: What is the father’s microchip number?See Guidance to Q4 above.Q16: Has the father had any surgery to correct features that could be inherited by the puppy?See the Guidance for Q11 above.ABOUT THE PUPPYQ17: Date of birthThe puppy should be at least 8 weeks old before they can leave their mum.Q23: Is the puppy subject to any Kennel Club endorsements?Before a puppy is sold the breeder can apply to the Kennel Club to place endorsements on his/her records(including the registration certificate). For example:R – PROGENY NOT ELIGIBLE FOR REGISTRATION orX – EXPORT PEDIGREE NOT ALLOWED.The breeder must explain what the endorsements mean before you agree to buy the puppy. AWF and RSPCA 2012–2018Page 9 of 17

Q24: What is the puppy’s microchip number?Microchipping is the best way for dogs and puppies to be identified and returned to their owners if they get lostor stolen. It is a legal requirement in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland that all puppies aremicrochipped by the time they are eight weeks old and before they go to their new homes.It is also a legal requirement for the new owner to contact the relevant database to update their records with theircontact details.A puppy is only exempt from being microchipped for health reasons if a vet certifies it in writing. In this case youshould ask for a copy of the certificate and speak to your vet about getting your puppy microchipped.Q25: Is the puppy covered by a breeder’s insurance policy?Breeders often insure their litters. Some insurance policies provide free cover for new owners against a puppy‟sillness or injury for a limited period after the puppy has been bought. Check the details.Q26: Was this puppy born by caesarean section?See Guidance to Q6 about caesarean sections.Q27: Will the puppy be vaccinated before being sold?Vaccinations are very important to prevent certain deadly diseases such as parvovirus. If the mother wasvaccinated properly the puppy should have resistance to these diseases for roughly the first 10 weeks of his/herlife. If your puppy has been vaccinated, the breeder‟s vet will have given them a vaccination certificate whichshows the vaccination date and the products used. Speak to your vet about whether the puppy needs any morevaccinations and when his/her first booster is due.Q28: Details of worming treatments the puppy will have receivedRegular worming is important for all puppies, whether the mother was wormed or not, for the health of puppiesand humans. Ask your vet about any products listed and avoid buying from breeders who have not treated theirdogs for worms at all.Q29: Has the puppy’s tail been docked?The law bans tail docking in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland except under certain conditions and only whencarried out by a vet. In Scotland there is a total ban.Tail docking involves removing a puppy‟s tail either by cutting it off or using a tight rubber band to make it die.Many animal welfare and veterinary organisations are strongly opposed to the practice unless the tail is injuredor diseased. It causes pain and even death in some puppies and can cause long-term health problems. It canalso reduce how well dogs can communicate with each other.A leaflet which explains the rules on tail docking in the UK can be downloaded g-dogsIf the puppy has been docked legally you must be given a certificate signed by the vet who did the docking.Q30: Has the puppy had a health check or been treated by a vet for any reason?Many puppies don‟t need to see a vet before they leave their breeder. If your puppy has been checked or receivedany treatment, the breeder should give you details of anything abnormal that the vet noted. Talk to your vet if youare not sure about any of this information.It‟s best to get your puppy examined by your vet as soon as you can, to make sure there are no problems andto get advice about things such as food, vaccination, worming, fleas, insurance, microchipping, neuteringand socialisation. AWF and RSPCA 2012–2018Page 10 of 17

Q31: What is the puppy’s current weight?There is no single correct weight for a puppy. However, it‟s really useful to know how much the puppy weighedwhen you got him so that your vet can see if he/she gains or loses weight.Q32: Details of the puppy’s dietIt is important that you know the type of food that the puppy is used to and how often and when he/she is used tobeing fed, so that these can all be kept as similar as possible when you take the puppy home. Puppies should befed a weighed or measured amount of food at regular times.Q33: Will the buyer be given enough of the puppy’s current food for at least one week?When you change to a new food, you should do this gradually over four to five days, with increasing amounts ofthe new food replacing the previous food each day. If you change the puppy's food too quickly, this can causestomach upset or diarrhoea.Q34: Will toilet training be started before the puppy is sold?Puppies start to learn a preference at an early age for the surface that they toilet on. The more they use aparticular surface, the stronger this preference becomes. You can then continue training the puppy in a similarway, or expect to be really patient and consistent if you want to change their preference.Ask a professional trainer to help you with any further training of your puppy (www.abtcouncil.org.uk)Q35: Where is the puppy kept for most of the time?A puppy‟s early social and physical environment strongly influences their behaviour as adults. A puppy that haslived in a home environment, particularly in a part of it where people come and go, is more likely to be preparedfor life in a home. Where puppies have been kept in kennels, you need to check that they have experienced someaspects of a normal home environment at least some of the time.When you visit the puppy ask to see where he/she has been kept. Although you may be introduced to the puppyin a house, he/she may not usually be kept there. Are there food bowls, bedding, pens and so on?Q36: The puppy’s experience of contact with peopleThe period from 3–14 weeks of age in a puppy‟s life are critical in determining how he/she will react to people andnew situations. Lack of social contact during this period increases the risk of behaviours associated with fear andanxiety later in life.Puppies need to have contact with men, women and children during this period. In general, the more people thatpuppies have interacted with the better.Puppies which have had positive experience of lots of different types of people are less likely to be wary when youhandle and approach them. Ask the breeder if you can take as many members of your family as possible on yoursecond visit. Watch carefully how the puppy responds to adults and children who are acting normally andreasonably. Look for signs of the puppy wi

The puppy‟s mother (this is a legal requirement for licensed breeders in England) The puppy‟s father Other puppies in the litter 40. Is the puppy’s pedigree known? Yes No If yes, is the puppy‟s pedigree certificate attached to this information pack? Yes No 41. What is the relationship between the puppy File Size: 1MBPage Count: 17Explore furtherPuppy information pack instructions - The Kennel Clubwww.thekennelclub.org.ukPuppy - RSPCAwww.rspca.org.ukThe Perfect Dog & Puppy Sale Contract With Free Templatesbreedingbusiness.comWhat paperwork should the breeder give me? The Kennel Clubwww.thekennelclub.org.ukPuppy sale contracts and what they should contain Pets4Homeswww.pets4homes.co.ukRecommended to you b